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Serum protein profiling of B-cell lymphoma cohorts using the IMMRay microarray technology

Westberg, Kajsa LU (2020) KIMM05 20192
Department of Immunotechnology
Abstract
In the clinic today, patients with relapsed or aggressive lymphoma are often not sampled as no reliable test for risk are available and invasive biopsies are considered to provide no or limited information of clinical use. The only way of getting biological information on the disease for these patients, is by non-invasive method, such as blood sampling. Methods that detect disease specific characteristics, proteins, in blood are therefore of huge importance as they may help diagnose, stratify and monitor patients. This master thesis was an investigation of the potential of using proteins in the non-cellular part of blood, serum, as biomarkers for treatment response in Mantle Cell Lymphoma (MCL) and Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma (DLBCL).... (More)
In the clinic today, patients with relapsed or aggressive lymphoma are often not sampled as no reliable test for risk are available and invasive biopsies are considered to provide no or limited information of clinical use. The only way of getting biological information on the disease for these patients, is by non-invasive method, such as blood sampling. Methods that detect disease specific characteristics, proteins, in blood are therefore of huge importance as they may help diagnose, stratify and monitor patients. This master thesis was an investigation of the potential of using proteins in the non-cellular part of blood, serum, as biomarkers for treatment response in Mantle Cell Lymphoma (MCL) and Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma (DLBCL). Establishing biomarker signatures for the two diseases have high potential of improving treatment approach and survival of patients. In this study, a biomarker signature of seven proteins could be identified for MCL. High expression of these proteins was significantly correlated with poor prognosis. This finding must be validated but could be of clinical importance in the future. (Less)
Popular Abstract
Can a blood sample tell the doctors how to treat lymphoma patients in the most optimal way and how the patient progress throughout the treatment?
Cancer is the second leading cause of death and one third of us is expected to get diagnosed with cancer in our lifetime. We all know what cancer is. Or at least we think we do. But in fact, cancer is a collective name for a lot of different diseases with huge complexity and variety in characteristics making it difficult to fully understand it. What is common for all cancer types is that they develop from mutations in the genome of the cells, the DNA, which enables uncontrolled cell growth. This might lead to abnormal production of specific proteins. Measuring the proteins available in serum,... (More)
Can a blood sample tell the doctors how to treat lymphoma patients in the most optimal way and how the patient progress throughout the treatment?
Cancer is the second leading cause of death and one third of us is expected to get diagnosed with cancer in our lifetime. We all know what cancer is. Or at least we think we do. But in fact, cancer is a collective name for a lot of different diseases with huge complexity and variety in characteristics making it difficult to fully understand it. What is common for all cancer types is that they develop from mutations in the genome of the cells, the DNA, which enables uncontrolled cell growth. This might lead to abnormal production of specific proteins. Measuring the proteins available in serum, the non-cellular part of blood, from patients is one way of mapping the protein expression profile for different cancer types. This profile could serve as a fingerprint for the disease, a biomarker signature, making it possible to diagnose patients with high specificity and monitor patients throughout treatment. In this study we searched for biomarker signatures correlative to short survival in two types of lymphomas, a type of blood cancer.
Lymphoma is one of the ten most common cancer types and derives from our white blood cells. These cells circulate in the blood and play an important role in keeping us healthy, as they are the main players in our immune system. One subtype of white blood cells called B cells are the body’s factory of specific molecules, antibodies, that enables the body to destroy pathogens and develop immunity against diseases. Mutations in the maturation process of these cells may lead to development of cancer, so called B cell lymphoma.
This thesis has been focusing on finding biomarker signatures for two types of aggressive B cell lymphoma with short overall survival: mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) and diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL). To do so, we analysed serum samples taken at the timepoint of diagnosis, using the IMMRay technology. This technique makes it possible to use the immune system as an early and specific sensor for disease, by analysing mainly immunoregulatory proteins. A small volume of serum is enough to detect and measure around 200 unique serum proteins. No proteins significantly correlative to overall survival was found in the DLBCL cohort. It is important to note that this question is very complex, and there is a huge heterogeneity between the lymphoma patients complicating the question further. However, we could identify seven potential markers that were correlated to poor prognosis in the MCL cohort. These findings were compared with results from a previously performed study on samples taken at timepoint of relapse of MCL patients. These patients have been diagnosed with MCL, undergone treatment with great results but suddenly gotten worse again, i.e. relapse. There was no overlap between the biomarker signatures of diagnostic and relapse MCL, and the proteins significant for relapse MCL were all correlating to good prognosis. Before we can draw any conclusion, further biostatistical tests needs to be performed to evaluate the biomarkers and to understand the immunological variation between diagnostic and relapsed MCL as well as between MCL and DLBCL. Blood sampling is one of the most convenient ways of getting biological information to monitor patients throughout treatment, and serum analysis has high potential to contribute to treatment selection thus contributing towards better patient survival. (Less)
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author
Westberg, Kajsa LU
supervisor
organization
course
KIMM05 20192
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
language
English
id
9010249
date added to LUP
2020-05-27 10:14:06
date last changed
2020-05-27 10:14:06
@misc{9010249,
  abstract     = {In the clinic today, patients with relapsed or aggressive lymphoma are often not sampled as no reliable test for risk are available and invasive biopsies are considered to provide no or limited information of clinical use. The only way of getting biological information on the disease for these patients, is by non-invasive method, such as blood sampling. Methods that detect disease specific characteristics, proteins, in blood are therefore of huge importance as they may help diagnose, stratify and monitor patients. This master thesis was an investigation of the potential of using proteins in the non-cellular part of blood, serum, as biomarkers for treatment response in Mantle Cell Lymphoma (MCL) and Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma (DLBCL). Establishing biomarker signatures for the two diseases have high potential of improving treatment approach and survival of patients. In this study, a biomarker signature of seven proteins could be identified for MCL. High expression of these proteins was significantly correlated with poor prognosis. This finding must be validated but could be of clinical importance in the future.},
  author       = {Westberg, Kajsa},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Serum protein profiling of B-cell lymphoma cohorts using the IMMRay microarray technology},
  year         = {2020},
}