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A Benevolent Autocracy and the Environment

Put, Lisa LU (2020) STVK12 20201
Department of Political Science
Abstract
Democracy is often thought to be the most beneficial political regime for the environment. However, a persistent line of argument lays claim that a specific authoritarian type of governance is needed to manage environmental crises effectively. Authoritarian environmentalism is a concept that emerged during the 1970s when rapid industrialization caused severe environmental hazards. This ideology advocated the use of non-democratic measures to combat the environmental crisis as democracy was perceived as ineffective in managing the environment. While authoritarian environmentalism has been deconstructed from a historical perspective, it has yet to be situated in relation to discourse. This thesis aims to investigate how authoritarian... (More)
Democracy is often thought to be the most beneficial political regime for the environment. However, a persistent line of argument lays claim that a specific authoritarian type of governance is needed to manage environmental crises effectively. Authoritarian environmentalism is a concept that emerged during the 1970s when rapid industrialization caused severe environmental hazards. This ideology advocated the use of non-democratic measures to combat the environmental crisis as democracy was perceived as ineffective in managing the environment. While authoritarian environmentalism has been deconstructed from a historical perspective, it has yet to be situated in relation to discourse. This thesis aims to investigate how authoritarian environmentalism has been discursively constructed. Discourse examines the meaning and the manner in which meaning is constructed. In order to do so, this thesis assumes an argumentative discourse analysis approach while reviewing spoken statements from a single case study. Singapore was selected as the most appropriate case study due to its political regimes and environmental standpoint. This thesis will identify that national pride, consideration of future generations, individuality, and struggle to survive makeup AE discursive constructs in Singapore. Consequently, it can be concluded that using by discourse analysis, it was possible to show how Singaporean leadership envisioned the role of the environment in creating national solidarity in a post-colonial society. (Less)
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author
Put, Lisa LU
supervisor
organization
course
STVK12 20201
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
keywords
Autocracy, Environment, Authoritarian environmentalism, post-colonial, discourse analysis
language
English
id
9011002
date added to LUP
2020-08-05 11:20:48
date last changed
2020-08-05 11:20:48
@misc{9011002,
  abstract     = {Democracy is often thought to be the most beneficial political regime for the environment. However, a persistent line of argument lays claim that a specific authoritarian type of governance is needed to manage environmental crises effectively. Authoritarian environmentalism is a concept that emerged during the 1970s when rapid industrialization caused severe environmental hazards. This ideology advocated the use of non-democratic measures to combat the environmental crisis as democracy was perceived as ineffective in managing the environment. While authoritarian environmentalism has been deconstructed from a historical perspective, it has yet to be situated in relation to discourse. This thesis aims to investigate how authoritarian environmentalism has been discursively constructed. Discourse examines the meaning and the manner in which meaning is constructed. In order to do so, this thesis assumes an argumentative discourse analysis approach while reviewing spoken statements from a single case study. Singapore was selected as the most appropriate case study due to its political regimes and environmental standpoint. This thesis will identify that national pride, consideration of future generations, individuality, and struggle to survive makeup AE discursive constructs in Singapore. Consequently, it can be concluded that using by discourse analysis, it was possible to show how Singaporean leadership envisioned the role of the environment in creating national solidarity in a post-colonial society.},
  author       = {Put, Lisa},
  keyword      = {Autocracy,Environment,Authoritarian environmentalism,post-colonial,discourse analysis},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {A Benevolent Autocracy and the Environment},
  year         = {2020},
}