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Diffractive Assemblies and Invertebrate Spaces: Communal Struggle in the Mexican Anthropocene

Velez, Talia LU (2020) TKAM02 20201
Division of Ethnology
Abstract
The importance of spaces of resistance lies in their ability to subvert and even change the hegemonic discourse. However, and despite extensive research on geopolitics and space-making processes, little has been said on the power that subaltern spaces can have in this area. Thus, it is the aim of this thesis to demonstrate the existence and strength of these space-making practices – which I choose to call invertebrate spaces. That is, diffracted spaces of radical play that can allow for the insertion of subaltern identities into the hegemonic discourse. To exemplify this, I have performed extensive ethnographic research on three subaltern civil rights groups in Mexico City.
I chose this so-called postcolonial country because of its... (More)
The importance of spaces of resistance lies in their ability to subvert and even change the hegemonic discourse. However, and despite extensive research on geopolitics and space-making processes, little has been said on the power that subaltern spaces can have in this area. Thus, it is the aim of this thesis to demonstrate the existence and strength of these space-making practices – which I choose to call invertebrate spaces. That is, diffracted spaces of radical play that can allow for the insertion of subaltern identities into the hegemonic discourse. To exemplify this, I have performed extensive ethnographic research on three subaltern civil rights groups in Mexico City.
I chose this so-called postcolonial country because of its inherent subalternity in the world stage, and its continuing process of coloniality. This setting also allows me to clearly delineate the role of invertebrate spaces and their importance within the current decolonial body of work. Moreover, it leads me to argue that their furthering and nourishment is a moral imperative that should be taken up by academics and universities alike. (Less)
Abstract (Spanish)
La importancia de los espacios de resistencia radica en su capacidad para subvertir e incluso cambiar el discurso hegemónico. Sin embargo, y a pesar de una ya existente y extensa investigación sobre geopolítica y procesos de creación de espacio, poco se ha dicho sobre el poder que los espacios subalternos pueden tener en el discurso hegemónico. Por lo tanto, el objetivo de esta tesis es demostrar la existencia y fuerza de prácticas subalternas de creación de espacios, que elijo llamar espacios de invertebrados. Es decir, espacios difractados de juego radical que pueden permitir la inserción de identidades subalternas en el discurso hegemónico. Para ejemplificar esto, he realizado una extensa investigación etnográfica con tres grupos... (More)
La importancia de los espacios de resistencia radica en su capacidad para subvertir e incluso cambiar el discurso hegemónico. Sin embargo, y a pesar de una ya existente y extensa investigación sobre geopolítica y procesos de creación de espacio, poco se ha dicho sobre el poder que los espacios subalternos pueden tener en el discurso hegemónico. Por lo tanto, el objetivo de esta tesis es demostrar la existencia y fuerza de prácticas subalternas de creación de espacios, que elijo llamar espacios de invertebrados. Es decir, espacios difractados de juego radical que pueden permitir la inserción de identidades subalternas en el discurso hegemónico. Para ejemplificar esto, he realizado una extensa investigación etnográfica con tres grupos subalternos de lucha social en la Ciudad de México.
Elegí este país poscolonial debido a su subalternidad inherente en el escenario mundial, y su continuo proceso de colonialidad. Esta configuración también me permite delinear claramente en esta tesis la naturaleza de los espacios de invertebrados y su importancia dentro del cuerpo de trabajo descolonial actual. Además, me lleva a argumentar que la fomentación y apoyo a estos espacios es un imperativo moral que deberían asumir tanto académicos como universidades. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Velez, Talia LU
supervisor
organization
course
TKAM02 20201
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Latin-America, subaltern, postcolonial, decolonial, ethnology, cultural analysis, original peoples, Indigenous peoples
language
English
id
9012260
date added to LUP
2020-06-15 14:53:18
date last changed
2020-06-16 11:47:47
@misc{9012260,
  abstract     = {The importance of spaces of resistance lies in their ability to subvert and even change the hegemonic discourse. However, and despite extensive research on geopolitics and space-making processes, little has been said on the power that subaltern spaces can have in this area. Thus, it is the aim of this thesis to demonstrate the existence and strength of these space-making practices – which I choose to call invertebrate spaces. That is, diffracted spaces of radical play that can allow for the insertion of subaltern identities into the hegemonic discourse. To exemplify this, I have performed extensive ethnographic research on three subaltern civil rights groups in Mexico City.
I chose this so-called postcolonial country because of its inherent subalternity in the world stage, and its continuing process of coloniality. This setting also allows me to clearly delineate the role of invertebrate spaces and their importance within the current decolonial body of work. Moreover, it leads me to argue that their furthering and nourishment is a moral imperative that should be taken up by academics and universities alike.},
  author       = {Velez, Talia},
  keyword      = {Latin-America,subaltern,postcolonial,decolonial,ethnology,cultural analysis,original peoples,Indigenous peoples},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Diffractive Assemblies and Invertebrate Spaces: Communal Struggle in the Mexican Anthropocene},
  year         = {2020},
}