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Effectiveness of Climate-Smart Agriculture in Uganda: Evidence from Micro-Level Data

Gottschalk, Clara Marie LU (2020) EKHS42 20201
Department of Economic History
Abstract
I examine the climate-smart agricultural (CSA) practices of intercropping, inorganic fertilizer application and improved seeds use for their effects on crop yields in Uganda. Based on panel data from the Uganda National Panel Surveys (UNPS), I use a correlated random effects model and propensity score matching to explore the general effectiveness of CSA, the changing effects of CSA with climatological conditions and potential differences of the impact across Ugandan regions, agro-ecological zones and crop types. The empirical analysis indicates that the CSA practices of intercropping and improved seeds use are associated with higher agricultural productivity levels, increasing yields by around 48 to 56 percent according to the sample,... (More)
I examine the climate-smart agricultural (CSA) practices of intercropping, inorganic fertilizer application and improved seeds use for their effects on crop yields in Uganda. Based on panel data from the Uganda National Panel Surveys (UNPS), I use a correlated random effects model and propensity score matching to explore the general effectiveness of CSA, the changing effects of CSA with climatological conditions and potential differences of the impact across Ugandan regions, agro-ecological zones and crop types. The empirical analysis indicates that the CSA practices of intercropping and improved seeds use are associated with higher agricultural productivity levels, increasing yields by around 48 to 56 percent according to the sample, whereas inorganic fertilizer application does not have a general significant effect. The impact of an intercropped cultivation system is particularly strong or at least still positive when farmers are exposed to critical weather stress, while the positive effect of improved varieties is conditioned by climatic variables. Further, I find substantial differences in terms of effectiveness of CSA between agro-ecological zones of Uganda and crop types. My findings have important policy implications for targeted agricultural programs to improve the productivity and resilience of Ugandan smallholders being confronted with the adverse consequences of climate change. (Less)
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author
Gottschalk, Clara Marie LU
supervisor
organization
course
EKHS42 20201
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Climate Change, Climate-Smart Agriculture, Food Security, Uganda
language
English
id
9017640
date added to LUP
2020-07-03 11:59:02
date last changed
2020-07-03 11:59:02
@misc{9017640,
  abstract     = {I examine the climate-smart agricultural (CSA) practices of intercropping, inorganic fertilizer application and improved seeds use for their effects on crop yields in Uganda. Based on panel data from the Uganda National Panel Surveys (UNPS), I use a correlated random effects model and propensity score matching to explore the general effectiveness of CSA, the changing effects of CSA with climatological conditions and potential differences of the impact across Ugandan regions, agro-ecological zones and crop types. The empirical analysis indicates that the CSA practices of intercropping and improved seeds use are associated with higher agricultural productivity levels, increasing yields by around 48 to 56 percent according to the sample, whereas inorganic fertilizer application does not have a general significant effect. The impact of an intercropped cultivation system is particularly strong or at least still positive when farmers are exposed to critical weather stress, while the positive effect of improved varieties is conditioned by climatic variables. Further, I find substantial differences in terms of effectiveness of CSA between agro-ecological zones of Uganda and crop types. My findings have important policy implications for targeted agricultural programs to improve the productivity and resilience of Ugandan smallholders being confronted with the adverse consequences of climate change.},
  author       = {Gottschalk, Clara Marie},
  keyword      = {Climate Change,Climate-Smart Agriculture,Food Security,Uganda},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Effectiveness of Climate-Smart Agriculture in Uganda: Evidence from Micro-Level Data},
  year         = {2020},
}