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Belgen and the Parental Purse: The Impact of the Karamoja Famine on Intra-Household Resource Allocations

Latham, Matthew LU (2020) EKHS42 20201
Department of Economic History
Abstract
Early-life health shocks can have very serious long-term consequences for those exposed to them, a fact which must be considered when parents make decisions with regards to allocating resources across their children. Here, the 1980 famine in Karamoja, Uganda is used as a natural experiment in which to test whether parental investment responses reinforce or compensate the impacts of early-life shocks. Through a novel implementation of the Latent Engel Curve Approach, evidence is uncovered that boys, those exposed at younger ages and those living in a male-headed household were all more likely to see reinforcement of the famine’s effects, whilst girls, older children and those living under a female head were more likely to see compensatory... (More)
Early-life health shocks can have very serious long-term consequences for those exposed to them, a fact which must be considered when parents make decisions with regards to allocating resources across their children. Here, the 1980 famine in Karamoja, Uganda is used as a natural experiment in which to test whether parental investment responses reinforce or compensate the impacts of early-life shocks. Through a novel implementation of the Latent Engel Curve Approach, evidence is uncovered that boys, those exposed at younger ages and those living in a male-headed household were all more likely to see reinforcement of the famine’s effects, whilst girls, older children and those living under a female head were more likely to see compensatory effects. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Latham, Matthew LU
supervisor
organization
course
EKHS42 20201
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Human Capital, Differential Investment, Famine, Health, Uganda, Factor Analysis
language
English
id
9020129
date added to LUP
2020-07-03 12:14:44
date last changed
2020-07-03 12:14:44
@misc{9020129,
  abstract     = {Early-life health shocks can have very serious long-term consequences for those exposed to them, a fact which must be considered when parents make decisions with regards to allocating resources across their children. Here, the 1980 famine in Karamoja, Uganda is used as a natural experiment in which to test whether parental investment responses reinforce or compensate the impacts of early-life shocks. Through a novel implementation of the Latent Engel Curve Approach, evidence is uncovered that boys, those exposed at younger ages and those living in a male-headed household were all more likely to see reinforcement of the famine’s effects, whilst girls, older children and those living under a female head were more likely to see compensatory effects.},
  author       = {Latham, Matthew},
  keyword      = {Human Capital,Differential Investment,Famine,Health,Uganda,Factor Analysis},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Belgen and the Parental Purse: The Impact of the Karamoja Famine on Intra-Household Resource Allocations},
  year         = {2020},
}