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Double Jeopardy: Child Marriage & Intimate Partner Violence, the Dominican Republic perspective

Yorke, Frankseco LU (2020) EKHS02 20201
Department of Economic History
Abstract
Child marriage disproportionately affects 1 in 5 girls globally. Entry into early marriage predisposes women to intimate partner violence which affects 1 in 3 women globally. Dominican Republic has been affected by both phenomena, but studies examining the association is lacking. Also, studies in other countries mostly only focus on prevalence. This study examines differences in prevalence and levels of IPV between women who married as child and those who married as adults, identifying associated factors. It also explores the existence of a tendency for women to under-estimate the level of IPV experienced and variations in this tendency across the two groups of women in Dominican Republic.
Using data from a representative household survey... (More)
Child marriage disproportionately affects 1 in 5 girls globally. Entry into early marriage predisposes women to intimate partner violence which affects 1 in 3 women globally. Dominican Republic has been affected by both phenomena, but studies examining the association is lacking. Also, studies in other countries mostly only focus on prevalence. This study examines differences in prevalence and levels of IPV between women who married as child and those who married as adults, identifying associated factors. It also explores the existence of a tendency for women to under-estimate the level of IPV experienced and variations in this tendency across the two groups of women in Dominican Republic.
Using data from a representative household survey of 4083 women and employing binary logistic regression, this study finds that child marriage is associated with greater odds of being victims of emotional and physical IPV increasing their likelihood by 3%. Associations between child marriage and sexual IPV yielded insignificant results. Child marriage increased the odds of higher levels of physical IPV increasing its likelihood by 11%. Insignificant results were obtained for its association to higher levels of emotional and sexual IPV. There is a tendency for women to under-estimate the level of violence. Child marriage was associated with reducing the difference by 1.7%. Some factors which are generally protective factors for all women were risk factors for women married as children.
Successful interventions to combat IPV in child marriages will require examination of both the prevalence and the level of violence and how the associated factors differ from women who marry as adults. Proper assessment of the level of violence may require additional focus on the characteristics of the perpetrators. (Less)
Popular Abstract
Child marriage disproportionately affects 1 in 5 girls globally. Entry into early marriage predisposes women to intimate partner violence which affects 1 in 3 women globally. Dominican Republic has been affected by both phenomena, but studies examining the association is lacking. Also, studies in other countries mostly only focus on prevalence. This study examines differences in prevalence and levels of IPV between women who married as child and those who married as adults, identifying associated factors. It also explores the existence of a tendency for women to under-estimate the level of IPV experienced and variations in this tendency across the two groups of women in Dominican Republic.
Using data from a representative household survey... (More)
Child marriage disproportionately affects 1 in 5 girls globally. Entry into early marriage predisposes women to intimate partner violence which affects 1 in 3 women globally. Dominican Republic has been affected by both phenomena, but studies examining the association is lacking. Also, studies in other countries mostly only focus on prevalence. This study examines differences in prevalence and levels of IPV between women who married as child and those who married as adults, identifying associated factors. It also explores the existence of a tendency for women to under-estimate the level of IPV experienced and variations in this tendency across the two groups of women in Dominican Republic.
Using data from a representative household survey of 4083 women and employing binary logistic regression, this study finds that child marriage is associated with greater odds of being victims of emotional and physical IPV increasing their likelihood by 3%. Associations between child marriage and sexual IPV yielded insignificant results. Child marriage increased the odds of higher levels of physical IPV increasing its likelihood by 11%. Insignificant results were obtained for its association to higher levels of emotional and sexual IPV. There is a tendency for women to under-estimate the level of violence. Child marriage was associated with reducing the difference by 1.7%. Some factors which are generally protective factors for all women were risk factors for women married as children.
Successful interventions to combat IPV in child marriages will require examination of both the prevalence and the level of violence and how the associated factors differ from women who marry as adults. Proper assessment of the level of violence may require additional focus on the characteristics of the perpetrators. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Yorke, Frankseco LU
supervisor
organization
alternative title
Child Marriage & Intimate Partner Violence, the Dominican Republic perspective
course
EKHS02 20201
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Child marriage, Intimate Partner Violence, IPV, odds ratio, binary logistic regression
language
English
additional info
Author's contact: frankseco.yorke@gmail.com
id
9021286
date added to LUP
2020-07-03 12:02:19
date last changed
2020-12-31 03:40:37
@misc{9021286,
  abstract     = {Child marriage disproportionately affects 1 in 5 girls globally. Entry into early marriage predisposes women to intimate partner violence which affects 1 in 3 women globally. Dominican Republic has been affected by both phenomena, but studies examining the association is lacking. Also, studies in other countries mostly only focus on prevalence. This study examines differences in prevalence and levels of IPV between women who married as child and those who married as adults, identifying associated factors. It also explores the existence of a tendency for women to under-estimate the level of IPV experienced and variations in this tendency across the two groups of women in Dominican Republic.
Using data from a representative household survey of 4083 women and employing binary logistic regression, this study finds that child marriage is associated with greater odds of being victims of emotional and physical IPV increasing their likelihood by 3%. Associations between child marriage and sexual IPV yielded insignificant results. Child marriage increased the odds of higher levels of physical IPV increasing its likelihood by 11%. Insignificant results were obtained for its association to higher levels of emotional and sexual IPV. There is a tendency for women to under-estimate the level of violence. Child marriage was associated with reducing the difference by 1.7%. Some factors which are generally protective factors for all women were risk factors for women married as children. 
Successful interventions to combat IPV in child marriages will require examination of both the prevalence and the level of violence and how the associated factors differ from women who marry as adults. Proper assessment of the level of violence may require additional focus on the characteristics of the perpetrators.},
  author       = {Yorke, Frankseco},
  keyword      = {Child marriage,Intimate Partner Violence,IPV,odds ratio,binary logistic regression},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Double Jeopardy: Child Marriage & Intimate Partner Violence, the Dominican Republic perspective},
  year         = {2020},
}