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Detta är en annons

Wendel, Per LU and Lundstedt, Jesper LU (2021) JOUK10 20202
Journalism
Abstract
The experience of reading the news online has changed significantly for consumers in recent years. So-called native advertising has seen an increase which has resulted that the line between marketing and journalism has become blurred for a lot of people. Various studies show that consumers have difficulties perceiving what is native advertising and what is journalism when they’re asked to distinguish between them in their news feed.

The purpose of this thesis was to show how Bonnier News Brand Studio's (previously awarded as the best native advertising agency in the world) native ads use different journalistic stylistic devices and psychology to make their texts feel like they belong in an editorial context. This was achieved by looking... (More)
The experience of reading the news online has changed significantly for consumers in recent years. So-called native advertising has seen an increase which has resulted that the line between marketing and journalism has become blurred for a lot of people. Various studies show that consumers have difficulties perceiving what is native advertising and what is journalism when they’re asked to distinguish between them in their news feed.

The purpose of this thesis was to show how Bonnier News Brand Studio's (previously awarded as the best native advertising agency in the world) native ads use different journalistic stylistic devices and psychology to make their texts feel like they belong in an editorial context. This was achieved by looking at what stylistic devices actual editorial texts use and how they’re used, and comparing these to the devices of five native ads chosen by us. This analysis was then expanded upon through the implementation of a theoretical framework consisting of the persuasion knowledge model, cognitive schema and the rhetorical triangle to draw a conclusion on whether the chosen ads could be mistaken for editorial content or not. The analyses of the native ads were done through a qualitative comparative analysis method.

The results of the analysis showed that the native ads all mimicked the editorial content on a visual level, and their stylistic devices to a large extent, with headlines and lead paragraphs being extremely similar to the real thing in all five ads. There were, however, ways in which they differed from real journalism. Four out of five ads had the last or second to last paragraph very much selling a product which made the advertising more obvious. Despite this, just placing the ad in a journalistic context makes it more difficult for the reader to categorize or decode it as advertising. This means the advertisers can still build their brand and/or sell a product in their native ad without it being easily recognized as an advertisement.

Keywords: Native advertising, Journalism, Bonnier News Brand Studio, Folkspel, Coca-Cola, McDonald’s, Amazon (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Wendel, Per LU and Lundstedt, Jesper LU
supervisor
organization
course
JOUK10 20202
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
keywords
Native advertising, Journalism, Bonnier News Brand Studio, Folkspel, Coca-Cola, McDonald’s, Amazon
language
Swedish
id
9034872
date added to LUP
2021-01-20 16:03:41
date last changed
2021-01-20 16:03:41
@misc{9034872,
  abstract     = {The experience of reading the news online has changed significantly for consumers in recent years. So-called native advertising has seen an increase which has resulted that the line between marketing and journalism has become blurred for a lot of people. Various studies show that consumers have difficulties perceiving what is native advertising and what is journalism when they’re asked to distinguish between them in their news feed.

The purpose of this thesis was to show how Bonnier News Brand Studio's (previously awarded as the best native advertising agency in the world) native ads use different journalistic stylistic devices and psychology to make their texts feel like they belong in an editorial context. This was achieved by looking at what stylistic devices actual editorial texts use and how they’re used, and comparing these to the devices of five native ads chosen by us. This analysis was then expanded upon through the implementation of a theoretical framework consisting of the persuasion knowledge model, cognitive schema and the rhetorical triangle to draw a conclusion on whether the chosen ads could be mistaken for editorial content or not. The analyses of the native ads were done through a qualitative comparative analysis method.

The results of the analysis showed that the native ads all mimicked the editorial content on a visual level, and their stylistic devices to a large extent, with headlines and lead paragraphs being extremely similar to the real thing in all five ads. There were, however, ways in which they differed from real journalism. Four out of five ads had the last or second to last paragraph very much selling a product which made the advertising more obvious. Despite this, just placing the ad in a journalistic context makes it more difficult for the reader to categorize or decode it as advertising. This means the advertisers can still build their brand and/or sell a product in their native ad without it being easily recognized as an advertisement.
 
Keywords: Native advertising, Journalism, Bonnier News Brand Studio, Folkspel, Coca-Cola, McDonald’s, Amazon},
  author       = {Wendel, Per and Lundstedt, Jesper},
  keyword      = {Native advertising,Journalism,Bonnier News Brand Studio,Folkspel,Coca-Cola,McDonald’s,Amazon},
  language     = {swe},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Detta är en annons},
  year         = {2021},
}