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A trinitarian analysis on how The United Nations Security Council failed to protect Timor-Leste's Independence and Human Rights through political action 1960-1999

Skagerlind, Evelina LU (2021) MRSK62 20202
Human Rights Studies
Abstract
The aim of this study is to research how the United Nations (UN) through the Security Council (SC) failed to act politically to protect the independence and human rights of Timor-Leste 1960-1999. 1960 Timor-Leste was acknowledged by the UN as a non-self-governing territory and so remained until the referendum of independence 1999. A trinitarian theory and method has been applied to contextualise and demarcate the material; “international media and public opinion” containing articles from international news agencies, “the front line” a historiographic literature and “political action” with resolutions from the UN. The purpose is to analyse how the UN SC acted politically to fulfill the UN Charter relating to human rights and the right of... (More)
The aim of this study is to research how the United Nations (UN) through the Security Council (SC) failed to act politically to protect the independence and human rights of Timor-Leste 1960-1999. 1960 Timor-Leste was acknowledged by the UN as a non-self-governing territory and so remained until the referendum of independence 1999. A trinitarian theory and method has been applied to contextualise and demarcate the material; “international media and public opinion” containing articles from international news agencies, “the front line” a historiographic literature and “political action” with resolutions from the UN. The purpose is to analyse how the UN SC acted politically to fulfill the UN Charter relating to human rights and the right of independence in the case of Timor-Leste. This study fills a research gap because of the time span, most studies focus on the peacekeeping mission 1999-2002. The conclusion is that the UN was unable to act politically regarding Timor-Leste's independence and human rights until Indonesia and the United States (U.S.) as a permanent member of the SC with a veto vote and geo-political interests in Indonesia, gave their consent. I argue that the UN SC, Indonesia and the U.S. had to act in the 1990’s. This due to the public opinion shaped by the international media outcry over the human rights violations in Timor-Leste demanding political action. The conclusion of this study is that the UN could not act politically without the consent of Indonesia and the SC. (Less)
Popular Abstract
The aim of this study is to research how the United Nations (UN) through the Security Council (SC) failed to act politically to protect the independence and human rights of Timor-Leste 1960-1999. 1960 Timor-Leste was acknowledged by the UN as a non-self-governing territory and so remained until the referendum of independence 1999. A trinitarian theory and method has been applied to contextualise and demarcate the material; “international media and public opinion” containing articles from international news agencies, “the front line” a historiographic literature and “political action” with resolutions from the UN. The purpose is to analyse how the UN SC acted politically to fulfill the UN Charter relating to human rights and the right of... (More)
The aim of this study is to research how the United Nations (UN) through the Security Council (SC) failed to act politically to protect the independence and human rights of Timor-Leste 1960-1999. 1960 Timor-Leste was acknowledged by the UN as a non-self-governing territory and so remained until the referendum of independence 1999. A trinitarian theory and method has been applied to contextualise and demarcate the material; “international media and public opinion” containing articles from international news agencies, “the front line” a historiographic literature and “political action” with resolutions from the UN. The purpose is to analyse how the UN SC acted politically to fulfill the UN Charter relating to human rights and the right of independence in the case of Timor-Leste. This study fills a research gap because of the time span, most studies focus on the peacekeeping mission 1999-2002. The conclusion is that the UN was unable to act politically regarding Timor-Leste's independence and human rights until Indonesia and the United States (U.S.) as a permanent member of the SC with a veto vote and geo-political interests in Indonesia, gave their consent. I argue that the UN SC, Indonesia and the U.S. had to act in the 1990’s. This due to the public opinion shaped by the international media outcry over the human rights violations in Timor-Leste demanding political action. The conclusion of this study is that the UN could not act politically without the consent of Indonesia and the SC. (Less)
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author
Skagerlind, Evelina LU
supervisor
organization
course
MRSK62 20202
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
keywords
Timor-Leste, East Timor, United Nations, Security Council, Independence, Human Rights, Colonialism, East Timor Question, Veto, International Relations
language
English
id
9039700
date added to LUP
2021-02-18 11:07:21
date last changed
2021-02-18 11:07:21
@misc{9039700,
  abstract     = {The aim of this study is to research how the United Nations (UN) through the Security Council (SC) failed to act politically to protect the independence and human rights of Timor-Leste 1960-1999. 1960 Timor-Leste was acknowledged by the UN as a non-self-governing territory and so remained until the referendum of independence 1999. A trinitarian theory and method has been applied to contextualise and demarcate the material; “international media and public opinion” containing articles from international news agencies, “the front line” a historiographic literature and “political action” with resolutions from the UN. The purpose is to analyse how the UN SC acted politically to fulfill the UN Charter relating to human rights and the right of independence in the case of Timor-Leste. This study fills a research gap because of the time span, most studies focus on the peacekeeping mission 1999-2002. The conclusion is that the UN was unable to act politically regarding Timor-Leste's independence and human rights until Indonesia and the United States (U.S.) as a permanent member of the SC with a veto vote and geo-political interests in Indonesia, gave their consent. I argue that the UN SC, Indonesia and the U.S. had to act in the 1990’s. This due to the public opinion shaped by the international media outcry over the human rights violations in Timor-Leste demanding political action. The conclusion of this study is that the UN could not act politically without the consent of Indonesia and the SC.},
  author       = {Skagerlind, Evelina},
  keyword      = {Timor-Leste,East Timor,United Nations,Security Council,Independence,Human Rights,Colonialism,East Timor Question,Veto,International Relations},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {A trinitarian analysis on how The United Nations Security Council failed to protect Timor-Leste's Independence and Human Rights through political action 1960-1999},
  year         = {2021},
}