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Förälder är lika med mamma: Synen på föräldraskap hos professionella som möter missbrukare.

Bennheden Agrell, Sigrid (2009)
School of Social Work
Abstract
Despite the fact that men dominate substance abuse research and that most programs to target substance abuse therefore are developed by and for men, very little is known about the fact that substance abusing men can also be parents. Mothers are up until today regarded as the most important parent even though society is changing and fathers are taken a more active part in childrearing. The average father today still spends significantly less time with his children than the average mother does and marginalised drug abusing fathers often disappear from their families altogether. The goal and purpose of this paper has been that through a qualitative analyses of written sources and qualitative interviews with healthcare professionals and social... (More)
Despite the fact that men dominate substance abuse research and that most programs to target substance abuse therefore are developed by and for men, very little is known about the fact that substance abusing men can also be parents. Mothers are up until today regarded as the most important parent even though society is changing and fathers are taken a more active part in childrearing. The average father today still spends significantly less time with his children than the average mother does and marginalised drug abusing fathers often disappear from their families altogether. The goal and purpose of this paper has been that through a qualitative analyses of written sources and qualitative interviews with healthcare professionals and social workers recognise how marginalised drug abusing fathers interests of taking part in their children's lives are met by healthcare, treatment and child protection agencies and how we can understand marginalised fathering as an extension of how we view ordinary fathering. I wanted to examine if there are any specific actions taken in involving these men as fathers and how we can understand their situation. Professionals have to face the fact that many men chose not take part in their children's lives. My study do show that fathers are not perceived as parents in the same way as mothers are throughout the society and that traditional gender roles unquestioned do take a big part in how social workers and healthcare professionals view parenting which makes it especially hard for marginalised men to become participating fathers. Even though there is a wish to include fathers there is a lack of both resources and specific methods to in reality do it. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Bennheden Agrell, Sigrid
supervisor
organization
year
type
H1 - Master's Degree (One Year)
subject
keywords
missbruk, föräldraskap, pappor, Social problems and welfare, national insurance, Sociala problem, social välfärd, socialförsäkring
language
Swedish
id
1315418
date added to LUP
2009-02-11 00:00:00
date last changed
2009-02-11 00:00:00
@misc{1315418,
  abstract     = {Despite the fact that men dominate substance abuse research and that most programs to target substance abuse therefore are developed by and for men, very little is known about the fact that substance abusing men can also be parents. Mothers are up until today regarded as the most important parent even though society is changing and fathers are taken a more active part in childrearing. The average father today still spends significantly less time with his children than the average mother does and marginalised drug abusing fathers often disappear from their families altogether. The goal and purpose of this paper has been that through a qualitative analyses of written sources and qualitative interviews with healthcare professionals and social workers recognise how marginalised drug abusing fathers interests of taking part in their children's lives are met by healthcare, treatment and child protection agencies and how we can understand marginalised fathering as an extension of how we view ordinary fathering. I wanted to examine if there are any specific actions taken in involving these men as fathers and how we can understand their situation. Professionals have to face the fact that many men chose not take part in their children's lives. My study do show that fathers are not perceived as parents in the same way as mothers are throughout the society and that traditional gender roles unquestioned do take a big part in how social workers and healthcare professionals view parenting which makes it especially hard for marginalised men to become participating fathers. Even though there is a wish to include fathers there is a lack of both resources and specific methods to in reality do it.},
  author       = {Bennheden Agrell, Sigrid},
  keyword      = {missbruk,föräldraskap,pappor,Social problems and welfare, national insurance,Sociala problem, social välfärd, socialförsäkring},
  language     = {swe},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Förälder är lika med mamma: Synen på föräldraskap hos professionella som möter missbrukare.},
  year         = {2009},
}