Advanced

Management of used packaging in the European Union

Winberg, Dan and Nilsson, David (1999)
Packaging Logistics
Abstract
Packaging is one of the logistics areas where there often is potential and even a demand for improvements. An increase in environmental awareness among the population in the European Union (EU) has generated a demand for changes in packaging, which has led to stricter rules and regulations. Knowledge about what regulations are present and what may be expected in the future is crucial in the forming of a packaging strategy for Perstorp Specialty Chemicals. Questions to be answered are for example:

What present and future rules and regulations in the EU concern handling of packaging after emptying? What alternatives regarding handling of used packaging are available today in the different countries of EU? How can Perstorp Specialty... (More)
Packaging is one of the logistics areas where there often is potential and even a demand for improvements. An increase in environmental awareness among the population in the European Union (EU) has generated a demand for changes in packaging, which has led to stricter rules and regulations. Knowledge about what regulations are present and what may be expected in the future is crucial in the forming of a packaging strategy for Perstorp Specialty Chemicals. Questions to be answered are for example:

What present and future rules and regulations in the EU concern handling of packaging after emptying? What alternatives regarding handling of used packaging are available today in the different countries of EU? How can Perstorp Specialty Chemicals adapt to these regulations and take care of their used packaging in an environmentally more friendly way?

Material for this report has been taken from the Internet, books, articles, law prints and brochures from companies/organisations. These sources have been followed up by interviews, written questionnaires and case studies.

A directive (94/62/EC) on Packaging and Packaging Waste came into force the 2Oth December

1994. This directive cover all packaging placed on the market, and all kind of packaging, within

the EU. Each member state shall take the necessary steps to reach the following targets by 2001:

50% as a minimum and 65% as a maximum by weight of the packaging must be recovered, and

25% as a minimum and 45% as a maximum by weight must be recycled.

All member states have chosen different ways in reaching these targets. There are four ways for an exporting company to meet with this. To take back the used packaging yourself, pay the importer for taking over the responsibilities, join an organisation to take care of the used packaging or use a collection system provided by the supplier of the packaging.

The directive will be reviewed every five years, but for the next period (starting in 2001) the only substantial changes will probably be in the recovery/recycling targets.

Options for waste management are often arranged in a hierarchical manner including prevention, reuse, recovery and landfill/incineration. The hierarchy is not explicitly expressed in the Directive, but supported by the European Commission. A life cycle assessment should be performed to find the best way of disposing the used packaging in each specific case.

There are different ways of taking care of the used packaging in the different countries of EU. There is no possibility to say that one way of handling certain packaging is more environmentally friendly than another, analysis has to be done for every case. For the packaging used by Perstorp Specialty Chemicals division Polyols there is today no need for any sudden changes to be able to continue to deliver products. This does not mean that no changes should be done. As the targets are getting higher and there is economic means introduced it will require changes to continue being a strong competitor. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Winberg, Dan and Nilsson, David
supervisor
organization
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
used packaging, european union, LCA, Technological sciences, Teknik
language
English
id
1318485
date added to LUP
2008-06-03 00:00:00
date last changed
2010-02-01 14:40:03
@misc{1318485,
  abstract     = {Packaging is one of the logistics areas where there often is potential and even a demand for improvements. An increase in environmental awareness among the population in the European Union (EU) has generated a demand for changes in packaging, which has led to stricter rules and regulations. Knowledge about what regulations are present and what may be expected in the future is crucial in the forming of a packaging strategy for Perstorp Specialty Chemicals. Questions to be answered are for example:

What present and future rules and regulations in the EU concern handling of packaging after emptying? What alternatives regarding handling of used packaging are available today in the different countries of EU? How can Perstorp Specialty Chemicals adapt to these regulations and take care of their used packaging in an environmentally more friendly way?

Material for this report has been taken from the Internet, books, articles, law prints and brochures from companies/organisations. These sources have been followed up by interviews, written questionnaires and case studies.

A directive (94/62/EC) on Packaging and Packaging Waste came into force the 2Oth December

1994. This directive cover all packaging placed on the market, and all kind of packaging, within

the EU. Each member state shall take the necessary steps to reach the following targets by 2001:

50% as a minimum and 65% as a maximum by weight of the packaging must be recovered, and

25% as a minimum and 45% as a maximum by weight must be recycled.

All member states have chosen different ways in reaching these targets. There are four ways for an exporting company to meet with this. To take back the used packaging yourself, pay the importer for taking over the responsibilities, join an organisation to take care of the used packaging or use a collection system provided by the supplier of the packaging.

The directive will be reviewed every five years, but for the next period (starting in 2001) the only substantial changes will probably be in the recovery/recycling targets.

Options for waste management are often arranged in a hierarchical manner including prevention, reuse, recovery and landfill/incineration. The hierarchy is not explicitly expressed in the Directive, but supported by the European Commission. A life cycle assessment should be performed to find the best way of disposing the used packaging in each specific case.

There are different ways of taking care of the used packaging in the different countries of EU. There is no possibility to say that one way of handling certain packaging is more environmentally friendly than another, analysis has to be done for every case. For the packaging used by Perstorp Specialty Chemicals division Polyols there is today no need for any sudden changes to be able to continue to deliver products. This does not mean that no changes should be done. As the targets are getting higher and there is economic means introduced it will require changes to continue being a strong competitor.},
  author       = {Winberg, Dan and Nilsson, David},
  keyword      = {used packaging,european union,LCA,Technological sciences,Teknik},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Management of used packaging in the European Union},
  year         = {1999},
}