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Energy Performance, Energy Efficiency & Commercial Buildings: How do they all link up? A quantitative and qualitative analysis of energy efficiency in buildings according to Directive 2002/91/EC

Heng, Kristy (2003)
The International Institute for Industrial Environmental Economics
Abstract
Buildings alone consume more than a third of the final energy consumption in Sweden, and contribute to approximately 20% of carbon dioxide (CO2) gas produced. This trend is especially worrying in the commercial building sector, because of the rate of increasing use of electricity, as compared to heat or primary fuel consumption. The requirements for energy performance of buildings has since been crystallized into Directive 2002/91/EC on the 16th of December 2002, calling for, amongst other things, the establishment of a standardized calculation method for energy performance in buildings, the corresponding minimum requirements, and a certification scheme for rating the performance in buildings.

This thesis focuses on the existing... (More)
Buildings alone consume more than a third of the final energy consumption in Sweden, and contribute to approximately 20% of carbon dioxide (CO2) gas produced. This trend is especially worrying in the commercial building sector, because of the rate of increasing use of electricity, as compared to heat or primary fuel consumption. The requirements for energy performance of buildings has since been crystallized into Directive 2002/91/EC on the 16th of December 2002, calling for, amongst other things, the establishment of a standardized calculation method for energy performance in buildings, the corresponding minimum requirements, and a certification scheme for rating the performance in buildings.

This thesis focuses on the existing commercial building stock in Sweden, and the necessary requirements to be established by authorities and industry, when the Directive comes into force in January 2006. The approach of the thesis is principally from the industry's point of view. It looks at the three main categories of concern raised by the Directive for existing buildings, and the implications that these concerns may have on the building and construction sector, with trends and information drawn from supporting European Union (EU) Member States.

The outcome of the thesis presents:

- An integrated framework methodology for assessing energy performance in existing office buildings, based on an integration of existing standardized calculation methodologies established at the European Committee for Standardization (CEN) and the establishment of performance-based standards in limiting the maximum energy use in buildings.

- The verification of the framework methodology, and an approach to building energy performance certification, based on the framework proposed, developing current practice in Sweden.

- A discussion into the variance of the simulated energy performance versus the actual energy performance of buildings, why such discrepancies occur, and how they can be reduced.

- Lastly, the implications this Directive has on the EU level of governance, the national level of authority, the building and construction industry, the consumer and the building occupant.

The sum of this thesis analyzes the impact of Directive 2002/91/EC in satisfying Kyoto Protocol commitments as ratified by the EU Member States, including Sweden.

It is important to note that the list of future research in relation to this Directive is extensive, and there exists a wide range of interpretations and opinions from different stakeholders and academics. The analysis presented in this thesis presents just one such approach deemed feasible for implementing Directive 2002/91/EC within the limited span of available time. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
@misc{1325281,
  abstract     = {Buildings alone consume more than a third of the final energy consumption in Sweden, and contribute to approximately 20% of carbon dioxide (CO2) gas produced. This trend is especially worrying in the commercial building sector, because of the rate of increasing use of electricity, as compared to heat or primary fuel consumption. The requirements for energy performance of buildings has since been crystallized into Directive 2002/91/EC on the 16th of December 2002, calling for, amongst other things, the establishment of a standardized calculation method for energy performance in buildings, the corresponding minimum requirements, and a certification scheme for rating the performance in buildings.

This thesis focuses on the existing commercial building stock in Sweden, and the necessary requirements to be established by authorities and industry, when the Directive comes into force in January 2006. The approach of the thesis is principally from the industry's point of view. It looks at the three main categories of concern raised by the Directive for existing buildings, and the implications that these concerns may have on the building and construction sector, with trends and information drawn from supporting European Union (EU) Member States.

The outcome of the thesis presents:

- An integrated framework methodology for assessing energy performance in existing office buildings, based on an integration of existing standardized calculation methodologies established at the European Committee for Standardization (CEN) and the establishment of performance-based standards in limiting the maximum energy use in buildings.

- The verification of the framework methodology, and an approach to building energy performance certification, based on the framework proposed, developing current practice in Sweden.

- A discussion into the variance of the simulated energy performance versus the actual energy performance of buildings, why such discrepancies occur, and how they can be reduced.

- Lastly, the implications this Directive has on the EU level of governance, the national level of authority, the building and construction industry, the consumer and the building occupant.

The sum of this thesis analyzes the impact of Directive 2002/91/EC in satisfying Kyoto Protocol commitments as ratified by the EU Member States, including Sweden.

It is important to note that the list of future research in relation to this Directive is extensive, and there exists a wide range of interpretations and opinions from different stakeholders and academics. The analysis presented in this thesis presents just one such approach deemed feasible for implementing Directive 2002/91/EC within the limited span of available time.},
  author       = {Heng, Kristy},
  keyword      = {commercial building sector,energy performance,Directive 2002/91/EC,assessing energy performance,energy performance certification,Environmental studies,Miljöstudier},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Energy Performance, Energy Efficiency & Commercial Buildings: How do they all link up? A quantitative and qualitative analysis of energy efficiency in buildings according to Directive 2002/91/EC},
  year         = {2003},
}