Advanced

The Role of Japan's Preferential Trade Agreements in Liberalising Agriculture

Menning, David (2006)
Centre for East and South-East Asian Studies, Lund University
Abstract
Where the 1990s was the era of multilateral trade liberalisation, the current agriculture-focused multilateral trade talks have dragged on with missed deadlines accompanied by a reluctance to act. In spite of this reluctance, there has been an emergence and proliferation of Free Trade Agreements in East Asia. These FTAs have provided briskly growing economies with the opportunity to develop discriminatory preferential trade agreements in an attempt to increase interactions through market and non-market channels, further accelerating their economic growth. Through similar political desires, Australia and Japan have developed their capacity to form a FTA, the major obstacle being Japan's agricultural industry. Lying at the very nexus of... (More)
Where the 1990s was the era of multilateral trade liberalisation, the current agriculture-focused multilateral trade talks have dragged on with missed deadlines accompanied by a reluctance to act. In spite of this reluctance, there has been an emergence and proliferation of Free Trade Agreements in East Asia. These FTAs have provided briskly growing economies with the opportunity to develop discriminatory preferential trade agreements in an attempt to increase interactions through market and non-market channels, further accelerating their economic growth. Through similar political desires, Australia and Japan have developed their capacity to form a FTA, the major obstacle being Japan's agricultural industry. Lying at the very nexus of trade liberalisation, Japan has one of the most heavily protected agriculture industries worldwide, the opponents to liberalisation being visible and vocal. In contrast, Australia has one of the most competitive agriculture industries with little if no government subsidy or protection. By analysing the dynamics and stakeholders behind Japanese agricultural trade liberalisation, obstacles and challenges are identified. An understanding of the mechanics within the Japanese agricultural industry as well as the market and political pressures coming from outside, allow the prospects for economic reform and growth to be specified. How Australia and Japan could possibly succeed in implementing a proposed FTA is made clear with implications for how such bilateral agricultural liberalisation may also have multilateral ramifications. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Menning, David
supervisor
organization
year
type
H1 - Master's Degree (One Year)
subject
keywords
FTA, Free Trade Agreement, Agriculture, Multilateral, Tariffs, Market Access, Trade Barrier, Liberalisation, Social sciences, Samhällsvetenskaper
language
English
id
1326353
date added to LUP
2006-03-13
date last changed
2006-03-13
@misc{1326353,
  abstract     = {Where the 1990s was the era of multilateral trade liberalisation, the current agriculture-focused multilateral trade talks have dragged on with missed deadlines accompanied by a reluctance to act. In spite of this reluctance, there has been an emergence and proliferation of Free Trade Agreements in East Asia. These FTAs have provided briskly growing economies with the opportunity to develop discriminatory preferential trade agreements in an attempt to increase interactions through market and non-market channels, further accelerating their economic growth. Through similar political desires, Australia and Japan have developed their capacity to form a FTA, the major obstacle being Japan's agricultural industry. Lying at the very nexus of trade liberalisation, Japan has one of the most heavily protected agriculture industries worldwide, the opponents to liberalisation being visible and vocal. In contrast, Australia has one of the most competitive agriculture industries with little if no government subsidy or protection. By analysing the dynamics and stakeholders behind Japanese agricultural trade liberalisation, obstacles and challenges are identified. An understanding of the mechanics within the Japanese agricultural industry as well as the market and political pressures coming from outside, allow the prospects for economic reform and growth to be specified. How Australia and Japan could possibly succeed in implementing a proposed FTA is made clear with implications for how such bilateral agricultural liberalisation may also have multilateral ramifications.},
  author       = {Menning, David},
  keyword      = {FTA,Free Trade Agreement,Agriculture,Multilateral,Tariffs,Market Access,Trade Barrier,Liberalisation,Social sciences,Samhällsvetenskaper},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {The Role of Japan's Preferential Trade Agreements in Liberalising Agriculture},
  year         = {2006},
}