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Education policies and Voices From Below in Bangladesh

Eriksson, Kristoffer LU (2009) SIMT25 20091
Master of Science in Development Studies
Graduate School
Department of Human Geography
Abstract
We need universal policies that can embrace the broad masses in the society. At the same time, this does not mean that these policies are good for everyone. There could be local knowledge and experiences from individuals that universal education policies fail to notice, see or neglect. It is important to have universal education policies that can embrace the broad masses. It is also important to know what individuals and people themselves reflect on, witness and experience from education. The whole picture is important, both the universal and local.

I will analyze education policies from UNESCO, SIDA, BRAC and the Bangladesh Government and also give the divorced and subaltern woman in Bangladesh a voice about her own view and... (More)
We need universal policies that can embrace the broad masses in the society. At the same time, this does not mean that these policies are good for everyone. There could be local knowledge and experiences from individuals that universal education policies fail to notice, see or neglect. It is important to have universal education policies that can embrace the broad masses. It is also important to know what individuals and people themselves reflect on, witness and experience from education. The whole picture is important, both the universal and local.

I will analyze education policies from UNESCO, SIDA, BRAC and the Bangladesh Government and also give the divorced and subaltern woman in Bangladesh a voice about her own view and experience of education. The broad questions for the thesis are: How do UNESCO, SIDA, Bangladesh government and BRAC reflect upon education in their education policies; and how do the individual divorced and the subaltern woman reflect upon education? I did two different studies to answer these two questions; one literature study and one Minor Field Study (MFS) with interviews in Bangladesh.

All the education policies complied and confirmed with the goals and policies adopted by the UN and UNESCO. Like the human capital theory; UNESCO, SIDA, the Bangladesh government, BRAC and the divorced and subaltern woman had an economic view on education. UNESCO, SIDA and the Bangladesh government all talked about the importance of gender, equality, right and equal opportunities; but they were still gender, culture and social blind for the local context. BRAC was also blind, but more sensitive to the local context then the three above. We need a vision of education that pays attention to capabilities, opportunities and social needs both on a universal and local context. (Less)
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author
Eriksson, Kristoffer LU
supervisor
organization
course
SIMT25 20091
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Subaltern, Divorced women, Voice, Top-down, Bottom-up, Bangladesh, Education, Women, Gender
language
English
id
1398920
date added to LUP
2009-07-02 09:25:38
date last changed
2015-12-14 13:34:52
@misc{1398920,
  abstract     = {We need universal policies that can embrace the broad masses in the society. At the same time, this does not mean that these policies are good for everyone. There could be local knowledge and experiences from individuals that universal education policies fail to notice, see or neglect. It is important to have universal education policies that can embrace the broad masses. It is also important to know what individuals and people themselves reflect on, witness and experience from education. The whole picture is important, both the universal and local. 

I will analyze education policies from UNESCO, SIDA, BRAC and the Bangladesh Government and also give the divorced and subaltern woman in Bangladesh a voice about her own view and experience of education. The broad questions for the thesis are: How do UNESCO, SIDA, Bangladesh government and BRAC reflect upon education in their education policies; and how do the individual divorced and the subaltern woman reflect upon education? I did two different studies to answer these two questions; one literature study and one Minor Field Study (MFS) with interviews in Bangladesh.

All the education policies complied and confirmed with the goals and policies adopted by the UN and UNESCO. Like the human capital theory; UNESCO, SIDA, the Bangladesh government, BRAC and the divorced and subaltern woman had an economic view on education. UNESCO, SIDA and the Bangladesh government all talked about the importance of gender, equality, right and equal opportunities; but they were still gender, culture and social blind for the local context. BRAC was also blind, but more sensitive to the local context then the three above. We need a vision of education that pays attention to capabilities, opportunities and social needs both on a universal and local context.},
  author       = {Eriksson, Kristoffer},
  keyword      = {Subaltern,Divorced women,Voice,Top-down,Bottom-up,Bangladesh,Education,Women,Gender},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Education policies and Voices From Below in Bangladesh},
  year         = {2009},
}