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The role played by civil society actors in the internalization of human right norms in South Africa during apartheid rule

Ndoping, Robert LU (2009) SIMT29 20091
Master of Science in Development Studies
Graduate School
Department of Political Science
Abstract
Norms can act as touch stones to understanding reality; they could be both regulative and constitutive in nature. But the extent to which norms can actually influence decision making remains a true test to the relevance of constructivist arguments. My research is both qualitative and constructivist in nature. It examines the role played by civil society actors in the internalization of human right norms in South Africa during apartheid rule. I have used civil society actors such as: the Christian resistance movement, trade unions and the black consciousness movement to illustrate how norms could be internalized in a state with strong internal factors (civil society) pulling down strings from external factors (western powers and regimes) to... (More)
Norms can act as touch stones to understanding reality; they could be both regulative and constitutive in nature. But the extent to which norms can actually influence decision making remains a true test to the relevance of constructivist arguments. My research is both qualitative and constructivist in nature. It examines the role played by civil society actors in the internalization of human right norms in South Africa during apartheid rule. I have used civil society actors such as: the Christian resistance movement, trade unions and the black consciousness movement to illustrate how norms could be internalized in a state with strong internal factors (civil society) pulling down strings from external factors (western powers and regimes) to act collectively, forcing policy change and hence a transition from an apartheid rule to a democratic nation. In accomplishing my task, I also used theories such as the ‘global civil society’ from the perspective of Kaldor 2003, the socialization process, boomerang effect and spiral models, all from Rise and Sikkink 1999. My sources are both primary (pamphlets and journals, written by organisations and also their web pages) and secondary (Books, journals, and also general articles from varied web sites and libraries). (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Ndoping, Robert LU
supervisor
organization
course
SIMT29 20091
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
South Africa, civil society actors, Norm internalization, apartheid, spiral model
language
English
additional info
I wish to make mention of the fact that this thesis is a revised version of an earlier submission entitled :The role played by civil society actors in the diffusion of human right norms in South Africa during apartheid rule.This new version invalidates the older version of the thesis.
id
1459306
date added to LUP
2009-09-17 12:15:40
date last changed
2014-06-10 09:58:22
@misc{1459306,
  abstract     = {Norms can act as touch stones to understanding reality; they could be both regulative and constitutive in nature. But the extent to which norms can actually influence decision making remains a true test to the relevance of constructivist arguments. My research is both qualitative and constructivist in nature. It examines the role played by civil society actors in the internalization of human right norms in South Africa during apartheid rule. I have used civil society actors such as: the Christian resistance movement, trade unions and the black consciousness movement to illustrate how norms could be internalized in a state with strong internal factors (civil society) pulling down strings from external factors (western powers and regimes) to act collectively, forcing policy change and hence a transition from an apartheid rule to a democratic nation. In accomplishing my task, I also used theories such as the ‘global civil society’ from the perspective of Kaldor 2003, the socialization process, boomerang effect and spiral models, all from Rise and Sikkink 1999. My sources are both primary (pamphlets and journals, written by organisations and also their web pages) and secondary (Books, journals, and also general articles from varied web sites and libraries).},
  author       = {Ndoping, Robert},
  keyword      = {South Africa,civil society actors,Norm internalization,apartheid,spiral model},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {The role played by civil society actors in the internalization of human right norms in South Africa during apartheid rule},
  year         = {2009},
}