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Information about chemicals in articles

Karlsson, Patrik LU (2008) IMEN41 20081
The International Institute for Industrial Environmental Economics
Abstract
This study assesses the problems of loss of information about chemicals throughout the
global product chain of toys, concentrated on import to the European Union. The aim of
the study was to use qualitative interviews as well as available literature to describe the
present situation regarding information about chemicals in the toy industry, to investigate
whether information is lost and in that case where and why. According to the results,
information about chemicals in toys is primarily lost in two different stages: high up in the
supply chain due to patent issues and production secrets of the chemical supplier, and at
the stage of import because the information was not requested here or in earlier tier of the
supply chain.
This... (More)
This study assesses the problems of loss of information about chemicals throughout the
global product chain of toys, concentrated on import to the European Union. The aim of
the study was to use qualitative interviews as well as available literature to describe the
present situation regarding information about chemicals in the toy industry, to investigate
whether information is lost and in that case where and why. According to the results,
information about chemicals in toys is primarily lost in two different stages: high up in the
supply chain due to patent issues and production secrets of the chemical supplier, and at
the stage of import because the information was not requested here or in earlier tier of the
supply chain.
This study also found out that information about chemicals in toys will be improved in the
EU within the near future, due to ongoing legislative revisions. The entry into force of the
recent EU chemical regulation REACH and the revision of the EU Toy Safety Directive
will bring stricter requirements on chemicals in nonelectrical
toys that are not chemical
products, and the Toy Safety Directive will also bring clearer provisions on responsibilities
for information transfer as well as improved provisions for surveillance.
Further on, this study investigated suitable ways of transferring information about
chemicals in toys. The findings on this issues suggest that even though it is not possible to
require companies to show exactly which substances are present in their products, there
seems to be benefits for the companies themselves about having as much information as
possible. Most importantly, importing companies need to be transparent with what their
products contain, to rebuild consumers' confidence in toys. (Less)
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author
Karlsson, Patrik LU
supervisor
organization
course
IMEN41 20081
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Chemicals in articles, consumption, hazardous chemicals, Toys
language
English
id
1481103
date added to LUP
2009-09-29 12:59:43
date last changed
2009-09-29 12:59:43
@misc{1481103,
  abstract     = {This study assesses the problems of loss of information about chemicals throughout the
global product chain of toys, concentrated on import to the European Union. The aim of
the study was to use qualitative interviews as well as available literature to describe the
present situation regarding information about chemicals in the toy industry, to investigate
whether information is lost and in that case where and why. According to the results,
information about chemicals in toys is primarily lost in two different stages: high up in the
supply chain due to patent issues and production secrets of the chemical supplier, and at
the stage of import because the information was not requested here or in earlier tier of the
supply chain.
This study also found out that information about chemicals in toys will be improved in the
EU within the near future, due to ongoing legislative revisions. The entry into force of the
recent EU chemical regulation REACH and the revision of the EU Toy Safety Directive
will bring stricter requirements on chemicals in nonelectrical
toys that are not chemical
products, and the Toy Safety Directive will also bring clearer provisions on responsibilities
for information transfer as well as improved provisions for surveillance.
Further on, this study investigated suitable ways of transferring information about
chemicals in toys. The findings on this issues suggest that even though it is not possible to
require companies to show exactly which substances are present in their products, there
seems to be benefits for the companies themselves about having as much information as
possible. Most importantly, importing companies need to be transparent with what their
products contain, to rebuild consumers' confidence in toys.},
  author       = {Karlsson, Patrik},
  keyword      = {Chemicals in articles,consumption,hazardous chemicals,Toys},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Information about chemicals in articles},
  year         = {2008},
}