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Den sexuella människohandeln - vad gör vi åt den?

Worobiec, Magda (2008)
Department of Law
Abstract
Trafficking for sexual purposes means that a person is being transported under slavery-like conditions from one place to another, this due to violence, misguidance or abuse, in order to later be abused sexually. Despite that article 4 in the UN declaration of human rights forbids slavery and slave trade, millions of women and children are seen as trade products and are forced into prostitution. In order to gain control over the situation, the UN and the EU have started pro-active programmes, established legal documents and created new laws. In March 1999, the Global Programme against Trafficking in Human Beings was launched. It was prepared by the UN centre for international prevention of crime (CICP) and the UN institutes for... (More)
Trafficking for sexual purposes means that a person is being transported under slavery-like conditions from one place to another, this due to violence, misguidance or abuse, in order to later be abused sexually. Despite that article 4 in the UN declaration of human rights forbids slavery and slave trade, millions of women and children are seen as trade products and are forced into prostitution. In order to gain control over the situation, the UN and the EU have started pro-active programmes, established legal documents and created new laws. In March 1999, the Global Programme against Trafficking in Human Beings was launched. It was prepared by the UN centre for international prevention of crime (CICP) and the UN institutes for inter-regional legal research (UNICRI). The aim of the programme is to help countries to fight trafficking. In December 2000, UN opened the convention against cross-boarder organized crime and its additional protocols about preventing, controlling and punishing of trade against people, specially women and children, for signing. In 2005, the Council of Europe assumed a convention against trafficking&semic The Convention on Action against Trafficking in Human Beings. In order for the convention to take force as planned, starting February 1st, 2008, ten of the members of the Council of Europe must ratify the convention. On October 24th, 2007, Cyprus ratified the agreement and became thereby the tenth State. In July 2002, the legal document 2002/629/RIF was set by the European Council, concerning controlling the human trade. The aim was to create a common regulation in the member states concerning criminal law consequences and other forms of criminal law measures that will be taken against trafficking. In April 2004, the 2003/81/EU directive was written, concerning current detaining conditions of third country citizens as victims of trafficking for a functioning collaboration with proper authorities. On July 1st, 2002, trafficking for sexual purposes was introduced as a new crime in Sweden. On July 1st, 2004, the law was broadened to also cover within the law for human trade that occurs within the country's boundaries, and human trade that aims to other forms of abuse than for sexual purposes, i.e. forced labour and trade with body organs. Another relevant bill is 2006/07: 53 ''implementing of EU the directive concerning victims for illegal human trade''. It suggests changes in the immigration law (2005:716) as a result of the Council of Europe's directive 2004/81/EU in April 2004, concerning detaining conditions of third country citizens. This law was not enforced until July 1st, 2007. (Less)
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author
Worobiec, Magda
supervisor
organization
year
type
H3 - Professional qualifications (4 Years - )
subject
keywords
Folkrätt
language
Swedish
id
1563128
date added to LUP
2010-03-08 15:55:31
date last changed
2010-03-08 15:55:31
@misc{1563128,
  abstract     = {Trafficking for sexual purposes means that a person is being transported under slavery-like conditions from one place to another, this due to violence, misguidance or abuse, in order to later be abused sexually. Despite that article 4 in the UN declaration of human rights forbids slavery and slave trade, millions of women and children are seen as trade products and are forced into prostitution. In order to gain control over the situation, the UN and the EU have started pro-active programmes, established legal documents and created new laws. In March 1999, the Global Programme against Trafficking in Human Beings was launched. It was prepared by the UN centre for international prevention of crime (CICP) and the UN institutes for inter-regional legal research (UNICRI). The aim of the programme is to help countries to fight trafficking. In December 2000, UN opened the convention against cross-boarder organized crime and its additional protocols about preventing, controlling and punishing of trade against people, specially women and children, for signing. In 2005, the Council of Europe assumed a convention against trafficking&semic The Convention on Action against Trafficking in Human Beings. In order for the convention to take force as planned, starting February 1st, 2008, ten of the members of the Council of Europe must ratify the convention. On October 24th, 2007, Cyprus ratified the agreement and became thereby the tenth State. In July 2002, the legal document 2002/629/RIF was set by the European Council, concerning controlling the human trade. The aim was to create a common regulation in the member states concerning criminal law consequences and other forms of criminal law measures that will be taken against trafficking. In April 2004, the 2003/81/EU directive was written, concerning current detaining conditions of third country citizens as victims of trafficking for a functioning collaboration with proper authorities. On July 1st, 2002, trafficking for sexual purposes was introduced as a new crime in Sweden. On July 1st, 2004, the law was broadened to also cover within the law for human trade that occurs within the country's boundaries, and human trade that aims to other forms of abuse than for sexual purposes, i.e. forced labour and trade with body organs. Another relevant bill is 2006/07: 53 ''implementing of EU the directive concerning victims for illegal human trade''. It suggests changes in the immigration law (2005:716) as a result of the Council of Europe's directive 2004/81/EU in April 2004, concerning detaining conditions of third country citizens. This law was not enforced until July 1st, 2007.},
  author       = {Worobiec, Magda},
  keyword      = {Folkrätt},
  language     = {swe},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Den sexuella människohandeln - vad gör vi åt den?},
  year         = {2008},
}