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CSR policies from a communication perspective

Yerznkyan, Tatevik (2010)
Department of Business Administration
Abstract
During recent years the question of sustainability and an increased focus on company’s responsibility have prevailed. From organizations, media, politicians and consumers the pressure on companies to act proactively in these issues are growing. Several different factors drive the development of a thought through corporate social responsibility (CSR) policy; reward from customers which may enhance price, to be a favored employer, independence of government, a long-term investment for a safer and better educated community (Crane & Matten, 2004/2007). In order to comply with this movement, most of the multinational companies have created policies that ensure their stakeholders of their intention to take responsibility for environmental... (More)
During recent years the question of sustainability and an increased focus on company’s responsibility have prevailed. From organizations, media, politicians and consumers the pressure on companies to act proactively in these issues are growing. Several different factors drive the development of a thought through corporate social responsibility (CSR) policy; reward from customers which may enhance price, to be a favored employer, independence of government, a long-term investment for a safer and better educated community (Crane & Matten, 2004/2007). In order to comply with this movement, most of the multinational companies have created policies that ensure their stakeholders of their intention to take responsibility for environmental issues, human rights and other ethical shaping behaviour such as for example ethics in business and a collaborative relationship between stakeholders. These corporate values may vary from one company to another and is part of the identity and image of the company, i e its trade mark. It is of particular importance how the employees understand and find meaning with the behaviour that is desired to comply with the company’s strategy and identity. ‘To the extent that an organization (as identity) is a significant source for identity work, people tend to view themselves as part of an overall ‘we’ and experience unity and closeness with the whole organization’ (Alvesson and Sveningsson, 2008). On the other hand, if the organization is perceived as ambiguous, the members tend to identify themselves with parts of the organization, for example the department or office they are belonging to, creating sub-cultures. (Less)
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author
Yerznkyan, Tatevik
supervisor
organization
year
type
H1 - Master's Degree (One Year)
subject
keywords
CSR policies, communication, sensemaking, Management of enterprises, Företagsledning, management
language
Swedish
id
1644411
date added to LUP
2010-06-03 00:00:00
date last changed
2012-04-02 18:24:23
@misc{1644411,
  abstract     = {During recent years the question of sustainability and an increased focus on company’s responsibility have prevailed. From organizations, media, politicians and consumers the pressure on companies to act proactively in these issues are growing. Several different factors drive the development of a thought through corporate social responsibility (CSR) policy; reward from customers which may enhance price, to be a favored employer, independence of government, a long-term investment for a safer and better educated community (Crane & Matten, 2004/2007). In order to comply with this movement, most of the multinational companies have created policies that ensure their stakeholders of their intention to take responsibility for environmental issues, human rights and other ethical shaping behaviour such as for example ethics in business and a collaborative relationship between stakeholders. These corporate values may vary from one company to another and is part of the identity and image of the company, i e its trade mark. It is of particular importance how the employees understand and find meaning with the behaviour that is desired to comply with the company’s strategy and identity. ‘To the extent that an organization (as identity) is a significant source for identity work, people tend to view themselves as part of an overall ‘we’ and experience unity and closeness with the whole organization’ (Alvesson and Sveningsson, 2008). On the other hand, if the organization is perceived as ambiguous, the members tend to identify themselves with parts of the organization, for example the department or office they are belonging to, creating sub-cultures.},
  author       = {Yerznkyan, Tatevik},
  keyword      = {CSR policies,communication,sensemaking,Management of enterprises,Företagsledning, management},
  language     = {swe},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {CSR policies from a communication perspective},
  year         = {2010},
}