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Enhanced Development through Microcredit

Lundqvist, Kina LU and Vestesson, Emma (2010) NEKK01 20101
Department of Economics
Abstract
Women represent the majority of the world’s poor, and are simultaneously discriminated against in access to land, jobs and financial resources. This study demonstrates how increased access to credit can help women circumvent problems of lacking job opportunities, increase their status and lead to enhanced development. The fact that credit to women spurs development to a greater extent that credit to men is an underlying hypothesis in this paper. Microcredit, failing credit markets, development and the targeting of women is thus the main focus, and Bangladesh is used as an illustrative case study of these effects. Data from 104 villages in Bangladesh collected in 1999 is studied through simple regressions examining the effects of... (More)
Women represent the majority of the world’s poor, and are simultaneously discriminated against in access to land, jobs and financial resources. This study demonstrates how increased access to credit can help women circumvent problems of lacking job opportunities, increase their status and lead to enhanced development. The fact that credit to women spurs development to a greater extent that credit to men is an underlying hypothesis in this paper. Microcredit, failing credit markets, development and the targeting of women is thus the main focus, and Bangladesh is used as an illustrative case study of these effects. Data from 104 villages in Bangladesh collected in 1999 is studied through simple regressions examining the effects of microcredit in general, as well as microcredit to women in particular, on education, consumption, and additional measures of standard of living such as access to electricity and sanitary toilets. To catch spillover effects not visible at the household level, an aggregate approach has been chosen, based on village data. The results indicate that microcredit to women has greater effect on the development outcomes compared to microcredit in general. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Lundqvist, Kina LU and Vestesson, Emma
supervisor
organization
alternative title
How microcredit, especially targeted at women, can have a positive effect on development
course
NEKK01 20101
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
keywords
Microcredit, Bangladesh, women, development
language
English
id
1667849
date added to LUP
2010-09-07 15:27:27
date last changed
2010-09-07 15:27:27
@misc{1667849,
  abstract     = {Women represent the majority of the world’s poor, and are simultaneously discriminated against in access to land, jobs and financial resources. This study demonstrates how increased access to credit can help women circumvent problems of lacking job opportunities, increase their status and lead to enhanced development. The fact that credit to women spurs development to a greater extent that credit to men is an underlying hypothesis in this paper. Microcredit, failing credit markets, development and the targeting of women is thus the main focus, and Bangladesh is used as an illustrative case study of these effects. Data from 104 villages in Bangladesh collected in 1999 is studied through simple regressions examining the effects of microcredit in general, as well as microcredit to women in particular, on education, consumption, and additional measures of standard of living such as access to electricity and sanitary toilets. To catch spillover effects not visible at the household level, an aggregate approach has been chosen, based on village data. The results indicate that microcredit to women has greater effect on the development outcomes compared to microcredit in general.},
  author       = {Lundqvist, Kina and Vestesson, Emma},
  keyword      = {Microcredit,Bangladesh,women,development},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Enhanced Development through Microcredit},
  year         = {2010},
}