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Collective Action Within the Global South: resolving collective action problems to narrow the North-South divide

Molaiepour, Sarah LU (2011) SIMT07 20101
Graduate School
Master of Science in Global Studies
Department of Political Science
Abstract (Swedish)
This paper aims to discover viable ways in which the Global South can effectively challenge the primacy of the Global North, in order to create a more equitable global order. This thesis is premised on a dependency approach to international relations which stipulates that the Global South, or Third World, is underdeveloped because of actions by the Global North, or the First World. The legacy left by colonialism can still be felt today as there still exists a relationship of exploitation and patronage between the First and Third World. Although the era of formal colonization may be over, the Third World is still lagging far behind the First World in political power. The lack of power available to individual Southern states makes it... (More)
This paper aims to discover viable ways in which the Global South can effectively challenge the primacy of the Global North, in order to create a more equitable global order. This thesis is premised on a dependency approach to international relations which stipulates that the Global South, or Third World, is underdeveloped because of actions by the Global North, or the First World. The legacy left by colonialism can still be felt today as there still exists a relationship of exploitation and patronage between the First and Third World. Although the era of formal colonization may be over, the Third World is still lagging far behind the First World in political power. The lack of power available to individual Southern states makes it imperative that these states band together if they are ever to be in a position to bargain effectively against the North. Using this idea, of the need for collective action by the Global South, this paper looks at viable ways in which collective action can be achieved. Two methods—international organizations and leadership—to overcome collective action problems, as proposed by Yoshimatsu (2006), are examined and tested within the context of Southern cooperation. Based on the results of my analysis, a comparison is conducted to determine in which direction Southern collective action should proceed if a more equitable global order is to result. (Less)
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author
Molaiepour, Sarah LU
supervisor
organization
course
SIMT07 20101
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
: North-South relations, hegemonic stability, collective action, dependency
language
English
id
1758021
date added to LUP
2012-09-05 07:50:13
date last changed
2012-09-05 07:50:13
@misc{1758021,
  abstract     = {This paper aims to discover viable ways in which the Global South can effectively challenge the primacy of the Global North, in order to create a more equitable global order. This thesis is premised on a dependency approach to international relations which stipulates that the Global South, or Third World, is underdeveloped because of actions by the Global North, or the First World. The legacy left by colonialism can still be felt today as there still exists a relationship of exploitation and patronage between the First and Third World. Although the era of formal colonization may be over, the Third World is still lagging far behind the First World in political power. The lack of power available to individual Southern states makes it imperative that these states band together if they are ever to be in a position to bargain effectively against the North. Using this idea, of the need for collective action by the Global South, this paper looks at viable ways in which collective action can be achieved. Two methods—international organizations and leadership—to overcome collective action problems, as proposed by Yoshimatsu (2006), are examined and tested within the context of Southern cooperation. Based on the results of my analysis, a comparison is conducted to determine in which direction Southern collective action should proceed if a more equitable global order is to result.},
  author       = {Molaiepour, Sarah},
  keyword      = {: North-South relations,hegemonic stability,collective action,dependency},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Collective Action Within the Global South: resolving collective action problems to narrow the North-South divide},
  year         = {2011},
}