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Challenges to Disaster Risk Reduction - a study of stakeholders' perspectives in Imizamo Yethu, South Africa

Roth, Annsofie LU (2011) In LUTVDG/TVBB—5358--SE VBR920 20111
Division of Fire Safety Engineering
Risk Management and Safety Engineering
Division of Risk Management and Societal Safety
Abstract
The concept of disaster risk reduction has gained more and more attention since the end of the 20th century due to the exponential increased loss of human lives and material losses, without any evidence of increased number of hazardous events. Instead of just managing disastrous events, a greater emphasis has been put on prevention efforts; an understanding of underlying drivers and vulnerabilities, and rapid urbanisation have been identified as one of the major factors shaping nations’ risks. The Disaster Management Act of South Africa offers a comprehensive framework for disaster risk reduction but the complex context of South Africa offers a range of challenges to fully implement the legislation. The rapid, and uncontrolled, community... (More)
The concept of disaster risk reduction has gained more and more attention since the end of the 20th century due to the exponential increased loss of human lives and material losses, without any evidence of increased number of hazardous events. Instead of just managing disastrous events, a greater emphasis has been put on prevention efforts; an understanding of underlying drivers and vulnerabilities, and rapid urbanisation have been identified as one of the major factors shaping nations’ risks. The Disaster Management Act of South Africa offers a comprehensive framework for disaster risk reduction but the complex context of South Africa offers a range of challenges to fully implement the legislation. The rapid, and uncontrolled, community growth of Imizamo Yethu, one of many informal settlements in South Africa, has resulted in multiple risks for the residents. This report investigates the challenges to disaster risk reduction from the stakeholders’ of Imizamo Yethu’s perspectives. The identified challenges can be grouped into five different categories: rapid community growth, lack of land, conflicting development agendas, institutional capacity and community risk behaviour. It is suggested that even though physical measures are put in place it is essential that it be supported by education to give people a chance to manage the risks facing them. (Less)
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author
Roth, Annsofie LU
supervisor
organization
course
VBR920 20111
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
disaster risk reduction, urbanisation, informal settlements, urban hazards, vulnerability, South Africa, Western Cape, the Disaster Management Act of 2002, grounded theory, Imizamo Yethu
publication/series
LUTVDG/TVBB—5358--SE
report number
5358
ISSN
1402-3504
language
English
id
1888342
date added to LUP
2011-04-06 16:49:26
date last changed
2014-03-10 10:40:38
@misc{1888342,
  abstract     = {The concept of disaster risk reduction has gained more and more attention since the end of the 20th century due to the exponential increased loss of human lives and material losses, without any evidence of increased number of hazardous events. Instead of just managing disastrous events, a greater emphasis has been put on prevention efforts; an understanding of underlying drivers and vulnerabilities, and rapid urbanisation have been identified as one of the major factors shaping nations’ risks. The Disaster Management Act of South Africa offers a comprehensive framework for disaster risk reduction but the complex context of South Africa offers a range of challenges to fully implement the legislation. The rapid, and uncontrolled, community growth of Imizamo Yethu, one of many informal settlements in South Africa, has resulted in multiple risks for the residents. This report investigates the challenges to disaster risk reduction from the stakeholders’ of Imizamo Yethu’s perspectives. The identified challenges can be grouped into five different categories: rapid community growth, lack of land, conflicting development agendas, institutional capacity and community risk behaviour. It is suggested that even though physical measures are put in place it is essential that it be supported by education to give people a chance to manage the risks facing them.},
  author       = {Roth, Annsofie},
  issn         = {1402-3504},
  keyword      = {disaster risk reduction,urbanisation,informal settlements,urban hazards,vulnerability,South Africa,Western Cape,the Disaster Management Act of 2002,grounded theory,Imizamo Yethu},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  series       = {LUTVDG/TVBB—5358--SE},
  title        = {Challenges to Disaster Risk Reduction - a study of stakeholders' perspectives in Imizamo Yethu, South Africa},
  year         = {2011},
}