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Factors affecting the small-scale production of artisan meat : A study of livestock farming in Sweden

Morchain, Daniel LU (2009) In IIIEE Master thesis IMEN41 20091
The International Institute for Industrial Environmental Economics
Abstract
This paper examines the structure of livestock farming and of the meat industry in Sweden, focusing on possibilities for small-scale farmers to develop, whether individually or in a group, self-sufficient systems of high quality meat production. The four areas identified as presenting structural difficulties (and in some cases opportunities) to small-scale producers are: i) the centralized structures of downstream production: this includes slaughterhouses and food retailers, and even farming practices; ii) existing cooperatives in the meat sector, which do not cater to the needs of the focus group; iii) subsidies granted by the European agricultural policy; and iv) the preferences and concerns of consumers and food retailers. The Swedish... (More)
This paper examines the structure of livestock farming and of the meat industry in Sweden, focusing on possibilities for small-scale farmers to develop, whether individually or in a group, self-sufficient systems of high quality meat production. The four areas identified as presenting structural difficulties (and in some cases opportunities) to small-scale producers are: i) the centralized structures of downstream production: this includes slaughterhouses and food retailers, and even farming practices; ii) existing cooperatives in the meat sector, which do not cater to the needs of the focus group; iii) subsidies granted by the European agricultural policy; and iv) the preferences and concerns of consumers and food retailers. The Swedish government has recently introduced policies to promote locally-produced food as well as small-scale and farm slaughter. This represents an opportunity for small-scale producers looking to develop a system of artisan meat based on production outside of the mainstream system. The two-year policy (2008-2010), however, needs to offer farmers more long-term support in order to encourage the necessary investments in set-up, as well as to bolster the ability of farmers to afford steep slaughterhouse operation costs. The present structure makes operating on a small scale very difficult because it pushes farmers to be a part of the mainstream system. However, with small volumes of livestock, the mainstream system offers no economic advantage and no possibility to offer artisan products. Finding ways to develop alternative small systems of production and distribution, on the other hand, is structurally and economically complicated, but farmers’ creative ways and new policy support mechanisms may be opening a space for this local initiative to mature. With adequate policy support and consumer enthusiasm, an increasing number of farmers could potentially find satisfaction and economic sense in shifting production ‘off-Broadway’. (Less)
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author
Morchain, Daniel LU
supervisor
organization
course
IMEN41 20091
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
publication/series
IIIEE Master thesis
report number
2009:10
ISSN
1401-9191
language
English
id
1891065
date added to LUP
2011-04-12 12:57:11
date last changed
2011-04-12 12:57:11
@misc{1891065,
  abstract     = {This paper examines the structure of livestock farming and of the meat industry in Sweden, focusing on possibilities for small-scale farmers to develop, whether individually or in a group, self-sufficient systems of high quality meat production. The four areas identified as presenting structural difficulties (and in some cases opportunities) to small-scale producers are: i) the centralized structures of downstream production: this includes slaughterhouses and food retailers, and even farming practices; ii) existing cooperatives in the meat sector, which do not cater to the needs of the focus group; iii) subsidies granted by the European agricultural policy; and iv) the preferences and concerns of consumers and food retailers. The Swedish government has recently introduced policies to promote locally-produced food as well as small-scale and farm slaughter. This represents an opportunity for small-scale producers looking to develop a system of artisan meat based on production outside of the mainstream system. The two-year policy (2008-2010), however, needs to offer farmers more long-term support in order to encourage the necessary investments in set-up, as well as to bolster the ability of farmers to afford steep slaughterhouse operation costs. The present structure makes operating on a small scale very difficult because it pushes farmers to be a part of the mainstream system. However, with small volumes of livestock, the mainstream system offers no economic advantage and no possibility to offer artisan products. Finding ways to develop alternative small systems of production and distribution, on the other hand, is structurally and economically complicated, but farmers’ creative ways and new policy support mechanisms may be opening a space for this local initiative to mature. With adequate policy support and consumer enthusiasm, an increasing number of farmers could potentially find satisfaction and economic sense in shifting production ‘off-Broadway’.},
  author       = {Morchain, Daniel},
  issn         = {1401-9191},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  series       = {IIIEE Master thesis},
  title        = {Factors affecting the small-scale production of artisan meat : A study of livestock farming in Sweden},
  year         = {2009},
}