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Child Labor in Rwanda: Perceptions of Post-Genocide Gender Norms

Bradley, Emily LU and De Vet, Annetta LU (2011) MIDM70 20111
LUMID International Master programme in applied International Development and Management
Abstract
In 1994, Rwanda was a country ravaged by ethnic violence of an incomprehensible scale as 800,000 people were killed within 100 days. Whilst the abhorrent events of Rwanda’s genocide lack justification, the genocide marked a turning point for women’s position in this traditionally patriarchal society. In this post-conflict context, this study investigates adults’ perceptions of the gendered division of child labor, providing insights into the processes of change that have and continue to occur. This study was guided by Grounded Theory and employs qualitative methods to gain a holistic understanding of these perceptions. Through analysis of both primary and secondary sources, a conceptualization model depicting the dominant emerging... (More)
In 1994, Rwanda was a country ravaged by ethnic violence of an incomprehensible scale as 800,000 people were killed within 100 days. Whilst the abhorrent events of Rwanda’s genocide lack justification, the genocide marked a turning point for women’s position in this traditionally patriarchal society. In this post-conflict context, this study investigates adults’ perceptions of the gendered division of child labor, providing insights into the processes of change that have and continue to occur. This study was guided by Grounded Theory and employs qualitative methods to gain a holistic understanding of these perceptions. Through analysis of both primary and secondary sources, a conceptualization model depicting the dominant emerging concepts, the Influential Factors of Shifting Gender Roles in Muko, is developed. The model shapes the analysis of perceptions focusing initially on the shifting demographics in the aftermath of the genocide and subsequent institutional reforms which are perceived to be highly influential in developing increasingly gender-equal attitudes amongst adults. Based upon the principles of Social Learning Theory, these attitude changes are transmitted to children through gender role socialization processes, and specifically through the conduit of child labor. As gender role socialization processes in childhood form the foundation for values and attitudes in adulthood, transmission of shifting gender norms will potentially contribute to enhanced gender equality amongst this community. Notwithstanding this, inconsistencies in actual behavior change were alluded to and demands further longitudinal quantitative and qualitative research to comprehensively analyze actual behavior and behavior change patterns. (Less)
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author
Bradley, Emily LU and De Vet, Annetta LU
supervisor
organization
course
MIDM70 20111
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Rwanda, genocide, gender norm transformation, shifting demographics, institutional reform, transmission of gender role attitudes, enhanced gender equality
language
English
id
1966843
date added to LUP
2011-09-13 11:55:13
date last changed
2013-06-18 12:58:32
@misc{1966843,
  abstract     = {In 1994, Rwanda was a country ravaged by ethnic violence of an incomprehensible scale as 800,000 people were killed within 100 days. Whilst the abhorrent events of Rwanda’s genocide lack justification, the genocide marked a turning point for women’s position in this traditionally patriarchal society. In this post-conflict context, this study investigates adults’ perceptions of the gendered division of child labor, providing insights into the processes of change that have and continue to occur. This study was guided by Grounded Theory and employs qualitative methods to gain a holistic understanding of these perceptions. Through analysis of both primary and secondary sources, a conceptualization model depicting the dominant emerging concepts, the Influential Factors of Shifting Gender Roles in Muko, is developed. The model shapes the analysis of perceptions focusing initially on the shifting demographics in the aftermath of the genocide and subsequent institutional reforms which are perceived to be highly influential in developing increasingly gender-equal attitudes amongst adults. Based upon the principles of Social Learning Theory, these attitude changes are transmitted to children through gender role socialization processes, and specifically through the conduit of child labor. As gender role socialization processes in childhood form the foundation for values and attitudes in adulthood, transmission of shifting gender norms will potentially contribute to enhanced gender equality amongst this community. Notwithstanding this, inconsistencies in actual behavior change were alluded to and demands further longitudinal quantitative and qualitative research to comprehensively analyze actual behavior and behavior change patterns.},
  author       = {Bradley, Emily and De Vet, Annetta},
  keyword      = {Rwanda,genocide,gender norm transformation,shifting demographics,institutional reform,transmission of gender role attitudes,enhanced gender equality},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Child Labor in Rwanda: Perceptions of Post-Genocide Gender Norms},
  year         = {2011},
}