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A Means to an End

Berg, Tobias LU (2011) STVK01 20111
Department of Political Science
Abstract
The aim of this essay is to examine the relationship between the European Commission and civil by focusing on the issue of legitimacy. This study takes a critical stand towards the prevailing view in the debate on the EU’s democratic deficit. This view that centers on that EU institutions, like national parliaments and governments, derive most of their legitimacy from public input, so-called input legitimacy. In accordance with this view civil society was brought forward during the 1990s as the perfect cure for the EU’s democratic deficit. Civil society-input into the policy process was looked on as the way for the Commission to acquire the legitimacy it needed. The actual role given to civil society in many policy processes seems however... (More)
The aim of this essay is to examine the relationship between the European Commission and civil by focusing on the issue of legitimacy. This study takes a critical stand towards the prevailing view in the debate on the EU’s democratic deficit. This view that centers on that EU institutions, like national parliaments and governments, derive most of their legitimacy from public input, so-called input legitimacy. In accordance with this view civil society was brought forward during the 1990s as the perfect cure for the EU’s democratic deficit. Civil society-input into the policy process was looked on as the way for the Commission to acquire the legitimacy it needed. The actual role given to civil society in many policy processes seems however to belie this conception that civil society input is critical for the Commission’s Legitimacy.
In this essay I instead bring forward a theoretical perspective that focuses on output legitimacy as the key for understanding how the Commission’s relationship to civil society. From this perspective output, in the form of a smooth effective integration process, is what brings the Commission legitimacy. This also means that the role of civil society is dependent on how the Commission thinks it can best achieve integration on an issue. This theoretical model is then tested on two policy processes; the Integrated Product Policy and the Emissions Trading Scheme, this comparison illustrates the point that civil society-input and input legitimacy is given priority only when it does not intervene with gathering consent on an issue from member states and when it does not stand in the way of integration. (Less)
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author
Berg, Tobias LU
supervisor
organization
alternative title
A study of the relationship between civil society and the European Commission from a legitimacy perspective
course
STVK01 20111
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
keywords
Commission, Civil society, Legitimacy, Consultation, Policy process
language
English
id
1968534
date added to LUP
2011-06-20 14:26:54
date last changed
2011-06-20 14:26:54
@misc{1968534,
  abstract     = {The aim of this essay is to examine the relationship between the European Commission and civil by focusing on the issue of legitimacy. This study takes a critical stand towards the prevailing view in the debate on the EU’s democratic deficit. This view that centers on that EU institutions, like national parliaments and governments, derive most of their legitimacy from public input, so-called input legitimacy. In accordance with this view civil society was brought forward during the 1990s as the perfect cure for the EU’s democratic deficit. Civil society-input into the policy process was looked on as the way for the Commission to acquire the legitimacy it needed. The actual role given to civil society in many policy processes seems however to belie this conception that civil society input is critical for the Commission’s Legitimacy.
In this essay I instead bring forward a theoretical perspective that focuses on output legitimacy as the key for understanding how the Commission’s relationship to civil society. From this perspective output, in the form of a smooth effective integration process, is what brings the Commission legitimacy. This also means that the role of civil society is dependent on how the Commission thinks it can best achieve integration on an issue. This theoretical model is then tested on two policy processes; the Integrated Product Policy and the Emissions Trading Scheme, this comparison illustrates the point that civil society-input and input legitimacy is given priority only when it does not intervene with gathering consent on an issue from member states and when it does not stand in the way of integration.},
  author       = {Berg, Tobias},
  keyword      = {Commission,Civil society,Legitimacy,Consultation,Policy process},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {A Means to an End},
  year         = {2011},
}