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Placing blame where it belongs : the relationship between the Canadian government and the aboriginal people in a spatial perspective

Gard, Linnea LU (2011) MRSG20 20111
Human Rights Studies
Abstract
There is a remarkable gap between the socio-economic living conditions of the urban
aboriginal people compared to other urban residents in Canada. The purpose of this essay is to explain why this gap is intact by explaining how urban space is intimately connected with the search for a national identity. The Canadian national identity was originally based on the displacement of the aboriginal people, but is now claiming multiculturalism as its official policy. But does this shift make a difference for the socio-economic living conditions of the aboriginal people?
This essay concludes that the social inequalities between the urban aboriginal people and other urban residents are caused by the dispossession and relocation of the aboriginal... (More)
There is a remarkable gap between the socio-economic living conditions of the urban
aboriginal people compared to other urban residents in Canada. The purpose of this essay is to explain why this gap is intact by explaining how urban space is intimately connected with the search for a national identity. The Canadian national identity was originally based on the displacement of the aboriginal people, but is now claiming multiculturalism as its official policy. But does this shift make a difference for the socio-economic living conditions of the aboriginal people?
This essay concludes that the social inequalities between the urban aboriginal people and other urban residents are caused by the dispossession and relocation of the aboriginal people by the Canadian government, creating a spatial isolation on reserves leading to an undereducated, under-employed and impoverished aboriginal population. When they migrate to urban areas, they end up in the margins of society, unable to improve their position. This essay argues that there is a structural reason for this inability, that within urban space lays the
power arrangements of society and that the relationship of domination and subordination still exists between the Canadian government and the aboriginal people. (Less)
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author
Gard, Linnea LU
supervisor
organization
course
MRSG20 20111
year
type
L2 - 2nd term paper (old degree order)
subject
keywords
aboriginal people, Canada, urban space, space, multiculturalism, national identity, socio-economic living conditions, persisting poverty, social inequality
language
English
id
1971476
date added to LUP
2011-07-04 12:22:57
date last changed
2014-09-04 08:27:53
@misc{1971476,
  abstract     = {There is a remarkable gap between the socio-economic living conditions of the urban
aboriginal people compared to other urban residents in Canada. The purpose of this essay is to explain why this gap is intact by explaining how urban space is intimately connected with the search for a national identity. The Canadian national identity was originally based on the displacement of the aboriginal people, but is now claiming multiculturalism as its official policy. But does this shift make a difference for the socio-economic living conditions of the aboriginal people?
This essay concludes that the social inequalities between the urban aboriginal people and other urban residents are caused by the dispossession and relocation of the aboriginal people by the Canadian government, creating a spatial isolation on reserves leading to an undereducated, under-employed and impoverished aboriginal population. When they migrate to urban areas, they end up in the margins of society, unable to improve their position. This essay argues that there is a structural reason for this inability, that within urban space lays the
power arrangements of society and that the relationship of domination and subordination still exists between the Canadian government and the aboriginal people.},
  author       = {Gard, Linnea},
  keyword      = {aboriginal people,Canada,urban space,space,multiculturalism,national identity,socio-economic living conditions,persisting poverty,social inequality},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Placing blame where it belongs : the relationship between the Canadian government and the aboriginal people in a spatial perspective},
  year         = {2011},
}