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Lågenergihus i torrt och varmt klimat

Moussaoui, Ali and Keanius Tzegai Bahta, Simon (2011)
Programmes in Helesingborg
Abstract
The construction sector currently accounts for 41.4% of the total energy consumption in Egypt and the residential sector accounts for more than half of all electricity consumed in the country. Therefore, there is great potential for reducing electricity use. Much of the electricity is used for lighting, air conditioning and hot water, a great part of this use can be reduced by passive climate control. We have made measurements in a traditional and a modern Egyptian house. Calculations of the building energy balance have also been carried out in order to find new ways to reduce the energy balance in the modern building. During the measurements, the relative humidity and temperature were measured. The traditional house is a good example of a... (More)
The construction sector currently accounts for 41.4% of the total energy consumption in Egypt and the residential sector accounts for more than half of all electricity consumed in the country. Therefore, there is great potential for reducing electricity use. Much of the electricity is used for lighting, air conditioning and hot water, a great part of this use can be reduced by passive climate control. We have made measurements in a traditional and a modern Egyptian house. Calculations of the building energy balance have also been carried out in order to find new ways to reduce the energy balance in the modern building. During the measurements, the relative humidity and temperature were measured. The traditional house is a good example of a 1600-1700 century private and wealthy Egyptian home that is using passive techniques to get a comfortable indoor climate. Measurements have been made in two different rooms: one in the southern part of the house with windows facing south and one in the northern part of the house with windows facing north. The room in the southern part of the house uses natural ventilation to cool the building. The modern house is a low-energy house and a good example of a modern house that uses passive techniques such as windcatcher to achieve comfortable indoor climate. Even a qualitative comparison was made between the traditional and the modern building. The calculation Program VIP Energy has been used to make energy balance calculation for the modern low-energy building. Energy calculation has been made for five different cases:
- With no change in the building envelope
- With external thermal insulation in the exterior walls
- With internal thermal insulation in the exterior walls
- With thermal insulation in the foundation
- With additional insulation in the roof structure
The results of these calculations show that the greatest reduction of required heat supply is with external thermal isolation in the exterior walls. When no change has been made in the building envelope, the required heat supply is 35.9 kWh / m² per year and with 50 mm mineral wool in the exterior walls, the heat supply is 14.3kWh/m² per year. The calculations also show that the required heat supply increases with thermal insulation in the foundation. (Less)
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@misc{1979177,
  abstract     = {The construction sector currently accounts for 41.4% of the total energy consumption in Egypt and the residential sector accounts for more than half of all electricity consumed in the country. Therefore, there is great potential for reducing electricity use. Much of the electricity is used for lighting, air conditioning and hot water, a great part of this use can be reduced by passive climate control. We have made measurements in a traditional and a modern Egyptian house. Calculations of the building energy balance have also been carried out in order to find new ways to reduce the energy balance in the modern building. During the measurements, the relative humidity and temperature were measured. The traditional house is a good example of a 1600-1700 century private and wealthy Egyptian home that is using passive techniques to get a comfortable indoor climate. Measurements have been made in two different rooms: one in the southern part of the house with windows facing south and one in the northern part of the house with windows facing north. The room in the southern part of the house uses natural ventilation to cool the building. The modern house is a low-energy house and a good example of a modern house that uses passive techniques such as windcatcher to achieve comfortable indoor climate. Even a qualitative comparison was made between the traditional and the modern building. The calculation Program VIP Energy has been used to make energy balance calculation for the modern low-energy building. Energy calculation has been made for five different cases:
- With no change in the building envelope
- With external thermal insulation in the exterior walls
- With internal thermal insulation in the exterior walls
- With thermal insulation in the foundation
- With additional insulation in the roof structure
The results of these calculations show that the greatest reduction of required heat supply is with external thermal isolation in the exterior walls. When no change has been made in the building envelope, the required heat supply is 35.9 kWh / m² per year and with 50 mm mineral wool in the exterior walls, the heat supply is 14.3kWh/m² per year. The calculations also show that the required heat supply increases with thermal insulation in the foundation.},
  author       = {Moussaoui, Ali and Keanius Tzegai Bahta, Simon},
  keyword      = {lågenergihus,egypten,klimatiseringsteknik,naturlig ventilation,energiberäkningar,skydome,vindfångare,vip energy,mit design advisor,mahoney table},
  language     = {swe},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Lågenergihus i torrt och varmt klimat},
  year         = {2011},
}