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Detection of mobile phone vibrations during walking

Martinsson, Max LU (2011) KOGM01 20092
Cognitive Science
Abstract
Today the use of mobile phones are widespread, and they are often kept in trouser pockets. As the thigh is comparatively less sensitive to vibrations, and vibrotactile sensitivity is diminished during movement, detection of vibratory mobile notications during walking is lower than in a still position. Vibrotactile detection rate is hypothesized to be dependent on gait phase.
Method: 28 subjects were recruited to walk with a mobile phone in their pocket. Vibrations of random patterns were delivered during a two-minute session. Accelerometer data was recorded to analyze the gait pattern.
Results & Discussion: No phase-dependent effect was found. However, consistent with previous studies, a linear correlation between vibration duration and... (More)
Today the use of mobile phones are widespread, and they are often kept in trouser pockets. As the thigh is comparatively less sensitive to vibrations, and vibrotactile sensitivity is diminished during movement, detection of vibratory mobile notications during walking is lower than in a still position. Vibrotactile detection rate is hypothesized to be dependent on gait phase.
Method: 28 subjects were recruited to walk with a mobile phone in their pocket. Vibrations of random patterns were delivered during a two-minute session. Accelerometer data was recorded to analyze the gait pattern.
Results & Discussion: No phase-dependent effect was found. However, consistent with previous studies, a linear correlation between vibration duration and detection rate was found, but only up to durations of one second. Possible explanations are discussed. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Martinsson, Max LU
supervisor
organization
course
KOGM01 20092
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
language
English
id
1979993
date added to LUP
2011-06-23 16:25:30
date last changed
2011-06-23 16:25:30
@misc{1979993,
  abstract     = {Today the use of mobile phones are widespread, and they are often kept in trouser pockets. As the thigh is comparatively less sensitive to vibrations, and vibrotactile sensitivity is diminished during movement, detection of vibratory mobile notications during walking is lower than in a still position. Vibrotactile detection rate is hypothesized to be dependent on gait phase.
Method: 28 subjects were recruited to walk with a mobile phone in their pocket. Vibrations of random patterns were delivered during a two-minute session. Accelerometer data was recorded to analyze the gait pattern.
Results & Discussion: No phase-dependent effect was found. However, consistent with previous studies, a linear correlation between vibration duration and detection rate was found, but only up to durations of one second. Possible explanations are discussed.},
  author       = {Martinsson, Max},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Detection of mobile phone vibrations during walking},
  year         = {2011},
}