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Choice Blindness for Body Size Preferences

Carlsson, Kristina LU (2011) KOGM20 20111
Cognitive Science
Abstract
Studies show that preferences can be learned through repeated choices and feedback is identified as a mechanism through which people can learn from a repeated choice structure. In this study participants were subjected to repeated choices of bodies and repeated false feedback regarding body size. Images presented to participants were in fact videos in which the bodies increased or decreased in size upon choice by participants. After manipulation of size on the bodies in front of participants, each participant gave a verbal report motivating their choice of body. This study consists of three separate pilots throughout which an experimental design structure and a computer program developed. Focusing on body size is highly motivated by the... (More)
Studies show that preferences can be learned through repeated choices and feedback is identified as a mechanism through which people can learn from a repeated choice structure. In this study participants were subjected to repeated choices of bodies and repeated false feedback regarding body size. Images presented to participants were in fact videos in which the bodies increased or decreased in size upon choice by participants. After manipulation of size on the bodies in front of participants, each participant gave a verbal report motivating their choice of body. This study consists of three separate pilots throughout which an experimental design structure and a computer program developed. Focusing on body size is highly motivated by the need to investigate in principles upon which therapeutic techniques and tools battling body preference disorders can be developed. This study shows a very low detection rate and stimuli have been sufficient enough for participants to focus on body size and proportions. 44% of 376 verbal reports in the third pilot emphasize body size and proportions, of these reports 61 % were conducted post to CB manipulation. This study shows promising results, possibly over-bridging the personal experience of feeling fat and evaluating others’ bodies on attractiveness. The study also shows indications of preference changes in certain directions post to a sequence of manipulated feedback. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Carlsson, Kristina LU
supervisor
organization
course
KOGM20 20111
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Choice Blindness, Body Image, Anorexia Nervosa, Therapeutic tools
language
English
id
1982066
date added to LUP
2011-06-23 16:25:20
date last changed
2011-06-23 16:25:20
@misc{1982066,
  abstract     = {Studies show that preferences can be learned through repeated choices and feedback is identified as a mechanism through which people can learn from a repeated choice structure. In this study participants were subjected to repeated choices of bodies and repeated false feedback regarding body size. Images presented to participants were in fact videos in which the bodies increased or decreased in size upon choice by participants. After manipulation of size on the bodies in front of participants, each participant gave a verbal report motivating their choice of body. This study consists of three separate pilots throughout which an experimental design structure and a computer program developed. Focusing on body size is highly motivated by the need to investigate in principles upon which therapeutic techniques and tools battling body preference disorders can be developed. This study shows a very low detection rate and stimuli have been sufficient enough for participants to focus on body size and proportions. 44% of 376 verbal reports in the third pilot emphasize body size and proportions, of these reports 61 % were conducted post to CB manipulation. This study shows promising results, possibly over-bridging the personal experience of feeling fat and evaluating others’ bodies on attractiveness. The study also shows indications of preference changes in certain directions post to a sequence of manipulated feedback.},
  author       = {Carlsson, Kristina},
  keyword      = {Choice Blindness,Body Image,Anorexia Nervosa,Therapeutic tools},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Choice Blindness for Body Size Preferences},
  year         = {2011},
}