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Migration and Asylum in the Accession Process of Turkey to the EU - A Case of 'Securitisation' According to the Copenhagen and the Paris Schools of Critical Security Studies?

Sarikoc, Sena LU (2011) STVM17 20111
Department of Political Science
Abstract
This study contributes to the current literature on migration and asylum as an empirical study that evaluates the increasing claims about their securitisation, in the context of membership negotiations between the EU and Turkey. Departing from the theoretical frameworks of the Copenhagen and the Paris Schools of critical security studies, the study moves onwards to propose an analytical framework that comprises both discursive and non-discursive practices. Accordingly, the study analyses official EU and Turkish discourse on migration and asylum as well as particular security technologies and bureaucratic policies (namely visa policy, border controls and readmission agreements) which are required to be implemented by Turkey as part of its... (More)
This study contributes to the current literature on migration and asylum as an empirical study that evaluates the increasing claims about their securitisation, in the context of membership negotiations between the EU and Turkey. Departing from the theoretical frameworks of the Copenhagen and the Paris Schools of critical security studies, the study moves onwards to propose an analytical framework that comprises both discursive and non-discursive practices. Accordingly, the study analyses official EU and Turkish discourse on migration and asylum as well as particular security technologies and bureaucratic policies (namely visa policy, border controls and readmission agreements) which are required to be implemented by Turkey as part of its accession to the Union. The study concludes that, although migration and asylum is not securitised in the accession process of Turkey to the EU in the Copenhagen School’s sense of the term; insecurity is inscribed into migration and asylum related themes through complicated linkages between policy issues, and negotiations in favour of the short-term political interests and fears of the EU and Turkey. (Less)
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author
Sarikoc, Sena LU
supervisor
organization
course
STVM17 20111
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
European Union, Turkey, migration and asylum, critical security studies, critical discourse analysis
language
English
id
2063518
date added to LUP
2011-08-31 15:46:41
date last changed
2011-08-31 15:46:41
@misc{2063518,
  abstract     = {This study contributes to the current literature on migration and asylum as an empirical study that evaluates the increasing claims about their securitisation, in the context of membership negotiations between the EU and Turkey. Departing from the theoretical frameworks of the Copenhagen and the Paris Schools of critical security studies, the study moves onwards to propose an analytical framework that comprises both discursive and non-discursive practices. Accordingly, the study analyses official EU and Turkish discourse on migration and asylum as well as particular security technologies and bureaucratic policies (namely visa policy, border controls and readmission agreements) which are required to be implemented by Turkey as part of its accession to the Union. The study concludes that, although migration and asylum is not securitised in the accession process of Turkey to the EU in the Copenhagen School’s sense of the term; insecurity is inscribed into migration and asylum related themes through complicated linkages between policy issues, and negotiations in favour of the short-term political interests and fears of the EU and Turkey.},
  author       = {Sarikoc, Sena},
  keyword      = {European Union,Turkey,migration and asylum,critical security studies,critical discourse analysis},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Migration and Asylum in the Accession Process of Turkey to the EU - A Case of 'Securitisation' According to the Copenhagen and the Paris Schools of Critical Security Studies?},
  year         = {2011},
}