Advanced

Forgone Opportunities? -A Study on the Underutilization of Women’s Potential in Developing Countries and Foreign Direct Investment.

Östergren, Anna LU and Göransson, Karin LU (2011) NEKM01 20111
Department of Economics
Abstract (Swedish)
The inflow of foreign direct investments (FDI) is considered as a major stimulus to economic growth in developing countries since it helps to overcome obstacles like shortages of financial resources, skills and technology. Sound institutions promoting growth and development are often considered as necessary in order to create a friendly investment climate. In many developing countries institutions permeated by gender inequalities, not utilizing the full potential of the population, are still present. The hypothesis tested in this thesis is that the outcomes of these institutions are inefficient and hence negatively correlated with FDI inflows.
The hypothesis is tested by using a panel approach with a data set covering 144 developing... (More)
The inflow of foreign direct investments (FDI) is considered as a major stimulus to economic growth in developing countries since it helps to overcome obstacles like shortages of financial resources, skills and technology. Sound institutions promoting growth and development are often considered as necessary in order to create a friendly investment climate. In many developing countries institutions permeated by gender inequalities, not utilizing the full potential of the population, are still present. The hypothesis tested in this thesis is that the outcomes of these institutions are inefficient and hence negatively correlated with FDI inflows.
The hypothesis is tested by using a panel approach with a data set covering 144 developing countries over the time period 1995-2009. In the regressions, the Gender Inequality indicator (GI) is used as a proxy for inefficient institutions permeated by gender inequalities. The results from the panel approach indicate a negative relationship between gender inequalities and FDI inflows. A narrow analysis over the importance of gender inequalities at different income levels further supports the significance of institutions creating efficient outcomes in order to attract FDI inflows. Throughout the analysis, market size appears to be the single most important factor explaining FDI inflows. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Östergren, Anna LU and Göransson, Karin LU
supervisor
organization
course
NEKM01 20111
year
type
H1 - Master's Degree (One Year)
subject
keywords
Gender inequality, developing countries, institutions, productivity, FDI, panel approach
language
English
id
2152992
date added to LUP
2011-09-27 08:10:17
date last changed
2011-09-27 08:10:17
@misc{2152992,
  abstract     = {The inflow of foreign direct investments (FDI) is considered as a major stimulus to economic growth in developing countries since it helps to overcome obstacles like shortages of financial resources, skills and technology. Sound institutions promoting growth and development are often considered as necessary in order to create a friendly investment climate. In many developing countries institutions permeated by gender inequalities, not utilizing the full potential of the population, are still present. The hypothesis tested in this thesis is that the outcomes of these institutions are inefficient and hence negatively correlated with FDI inflows. 
The hypothesis is tested by using a panel approach with a data set covering 144 developing countries over the time period 1995-2009. In the regressions, the Gender Inequality indicator (GI) is used as a proxy for inefficient institutions permeated by gender inequalities. The results from the panel approach indicate a negative relationship between gender inequalities and FDI inflows. A narrow analysis over the importance of gender inequalities at different income levels further supports the significance of institutions creating efficient outcomes in order to attract FDI inflows. Throughout the analysis, market size appears to be the single most important factor explaining FDI inflows.},
  author       = {Östergren, Anna and Göransson, Karin},
  keyword      = {Gender inequality,developing countries,institutions,productivity,FDI,panel approach},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Forgone Opportunities? -A Study on the Underutilization of Women’s Potential in Developing Countries and Foreign Direct Investment.},
  year         = {2011},
}