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Children's Inequality Aversion in Ultimatum Games

Nilsson, Victoria LU (2011) NEKK01 20111
Department of Economics
Abstract
Individuals do not only make decisions to maximize their own utility, but are also concerned with how their decisions affect others. Theories of inequality aversion, taking fairness considera¬tions into account, suggest that many people dislike inequalities between themselves and others.
Testing for inequality aversion is easiest done by using experimental economics, in this paper in the form of an ultimatum game. It is a bargaining game where the subjects get to bargain over a sum of money, with their economic behavior being analyzed and quantified afterwards.
Adults who participate act more selfishly if they have to earn their own wealth in the game before starting to play. In this paper, an experiment testing how earned wealth affects... (More)
Individuals do not only make decisions to maximize their own utility, but are also concerned with how their decisions affect others. Theories of inequality aversion, taking fairness considera¬tions into account, suggest that many people dislike inequalities between themselves and others.
Testing for inequality aversion is easiest done by using experimental economics, in this paper in the form of an ultimatum game. It is a bargaining game where the subjects get to bargain over a sum of money, with their economic behavior being analyzed and quantified afterwards.
Adults who participate act more selfishly if they have to earn their own wealth in the game before starting to play. In this paper, an experiment testing how earned wealth affects children’s behavior is constructed. This is done in order to show that as much as one can prove that even young children take fairness considerations into account, they can also act as selfish actors to a high extent, especially when earning their own wealth before being asked to share it with others. (Less)
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author
Nilsson, Victoria LU
supervisor
organization
course
NEKK01 20111
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
keywords
altruism, fairness, inequality aversion, ultimatum games, children
language
English
id
2155574
date added to LUP
2011-09-27 13:05:12
date last changed
2011-09-27 13:05:12
@misc{2155574,
  abstract     = {Individuals do not only make decisions to maximize their own utility, but are also concerned with how their decisions affect others. Theories of inequality aversion, taking fairness considera¬tions into account, suggest that many people dislike inequalities between themselves and others.
Testing for inequality aversion is easiest done by using experimental economics, in this paper in the form of an ultimatum game. It is a bargaining game where the subjects get to bargain over a sum of money, with their economic behavior being analyzed and quantified afterwards.
Adults who participate act more selfishly if they have to earn their own wealth in the game before starting to play. In this paper, an experiment testing how earned wealth affects children’s behavior is constructed. This is done in order to show that as much as one can prove that even young children take fairness considerations into account, they can also act as selfish actors to a high extent, especially when earning their own wealth before being asked to share it with others.},
  author       = {Nilsson, Victoria},
  keyword      = {altruism,fairness,inequality aversion,ultimatum games,children},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Children's Inequality Aversion in Ultimatum Games},
  year         = {2011},
}