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Effects of allocation of attention on initial racial face discrimination

Setterberg, Patrik LU and Lycke, Johanna LU (2011) PSYK01 20111
Department of Psychology
Abstract
Utilizing a modified version of the affect misattribution procedure, event-related brain potentials of 32 Caucasian participants were examined in order to study the effects of allocation of attention on early racial face perception and discrimination. When attention was directed away from faces, towards ambiguous non-face stimuli, larger N1s, peaking at approximately 110 ms after stimulus onset, were observed for faces from participants‟ outgroup as compared to N1s for faces from participants‟ ingroup, peaking approximately 114 ms after stimulus onset. When attention was directed towards face stimuli no difference in N1 amplitude was observed. Conversely, N2s observed were larger for participants‟ ingroup when attention was directed... (More)
Utilizing a modified version of the affect misattribution procedure, event-related brain potentials of 32 Caucasian participants were examined in order to study the effects of allocation of attention on early racial face perception and discrimination. When attention was directed away from faces, towards ambiguous non-face stimuli, larger N1s, peaking at approximately 110 ms after stimulus onset, were observed for faces from participants‟ outgroup as compared to N1s for faces from participants‟ ingroup, peaking approximately 114 ms after stimulus onset. When attention was directed towards face stimuli no difference in N1 amplitude was observed. Conversely, N2s observed were larger for participants‟ ingroup when attention was directed towards faces as well as non-faces. Results suggest that allocation of attention appears to have an effect on the early time-course of racial face discrimination. (Less)
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author
Setterberg, Patrik LU and Lycke, Johanna LU
supervisor
organization
course
PSYK01 20111
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
keywords
Event-related potentials (ERP), race discrimination, face perception, attention allocation, affect misattribution procedure (AMP)
language
English
id
2168294
date added to LUP
2011-10-12 09:25:20
date last changed
2011-10-12 09:25:20
@misc{2168294,
  abstract     = {Utilizing a modified version of the affect misattribution procedure, event-related brain potentials of 32 Caucasian participants were examined in order to study the effects of allocation of attention on early racial face perception and discrimination. When attention was directed away from faces, towards ambiguous non-face stimuli, larger N1s, peaking at approximately 110 ms after stimulus onset, were observed for faces from participants‟ outgroup as compared to N1s for faces from participants‟ ingroup, peaking approximately 114 ms after stimulus onset. When attention was directed towards face stimuli no difference in N1 amplitude was observed. Conversely, N2s observed were larger for participants‟ ingroup when attention was directed towards faces as well as non-faces. Results suggest that allocation of attention appears to have an effect on the early time-course of racial face discrimination.},
  author       = {Setterberg, Patrik and Lycke, Johanna},
  keyword      = {Event-related potentials (ERP),race discrimination,face perception,attention allocation,affect misattribution procedure (AMP)},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Effects of allocation of attention on initial racial face discrimination},
  year         = {2011},
}