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Single-step microfluidic generation of cell-sized giant unilamellar vesicles: Characterization and dielectrophoretic patterning and sorting

Thege, Fredrik LU (2011) EEM820 20111
Department of Biomedical Engineering
Abstract
Giant Unilamellar Vesicles (GUV) have the potential to play a dominating role in future scientific efforts to understand and model biological systems through the creation of artificial cells. GUV:s span a wide range of possible applications that include their use as biosensors, cell encapsulation agents and biomicroreactors. In order to allow GUV:s to reach their full potential, efficient, reliable and flexible generation methods are essential. Existing bulk methods suffer from many drawbacks while proposed microfluidic methods are still in the developing stages. In this report a novel vesicle generation technique is proposed, based on previously published principles.[28][31][29] Vesicles are created from double emulsion templates... (More)
Giant Unilamellar Vesicles (GUV) have the potential to play a dominating role in future scientific efforts to understand and model biological systems through the creation of artificial cells. GUV:s span a wide range of possible applications that include their use as biosensors, cell encapsulation agents and biomicroreactors. In order to allow GUV:s to reach their full potential, efficient, reliable and flexible generation methods are essential. Existing bulk methods suffer from many drawbacks while proposed microfluidic methods are still in the developing stages. In this report a novel vesicle generation technique is proposed, based on previously published principles.[28][31][29] Vesicles are created from double emulsion templates generated in a single-step flow focusing microfluidic device. The double emulsion generation was characterized and shown to allow generation in both the dripping and jetting regime of droplet generation. The lipid bilayers were created by extraction of excess solvent. The method allowed creation of vesicles in a wide size range (6.5-45µm) at high generation frequencies (300-3500Hz). The created vesicles were characterized using fluorescent methods and quantification of the permeability of the created membranes. Dielectrophoresis (DEP) was proposed and explored as a general method to manipulate generated vesicles. DEP allows for non-invasive, reversible and complex manipulation of vesicles. Patterning and size selective binary sorting using DEP was shown. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Thege, Fredrik LU
supervisor
organization
course
EEM820 20111
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
language
English
additional info
2011-05
id
2275249
date added to LUP
2012-01-02 15:11:58
date last changed
2014-10-08 14:47:00
@misc{2275249,
  abstract     = {Giant Unilamellar Vesicles (GUV) have the potential to play a dominating role in future scientific efforts to understand and model biological systems through the creation of artificial cells. GUV:s span a wide range of possible applications that include their use as biosensors, cell encapsulation agents and biomicroreactors. In order to allow GUV:s to reach their full potential, efficient, reliable and flexible generation methods are essential. Existing bulk methods suffer from many drawbacks while proposed microfluidic methods are still in the developing stages. In this report a novel vesicle generation technique is proposed, based on previously published principles.[28][31][29] Vesicles are created from double emulsion templates generated in a single-step flow focusing microfluidic device. The double emulsion generation was characterized and shown to allow generation in both the dripping and jetting regime of droplet generation. The lipid bilayers were created by extraction of excess solvent. The method allowed creation of vesicles in a wide size range (6.5-45µm) at high generation frequencies (300-3500Hz). The created vesicles were characterized using fluorescent methods and quantification of the permeability of the created membranes. Dielectrophoresis (DEP) was proposed and explored as a general method to manipulate generated vesicles. DEP allows for non-invasive, reversible and complex manipulation of vesicles. Patterning and size selective binary sorting using DEP was shown.},
  author       = {Thege, Fredrik},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Single-step microfluidic generation of cell-sized giant unilamellar vesicles: Characterization and dielectrophoretic patterning and sorting},
  year         = {2011},
}