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A study of susceptibility-weighted MRI including a comparison of two different implementations

Eriksson, Stefanie (2011)
Medical Physics Programme
Abstract (Swedish)
Susceptibility Weighted Imaging is an MRI- and post-processing technique that utilize the phase information from the MR signal to enhance the contrast in areas with different susceptibility than surrounding tissue in T2*-weighted images. This technique is becoming more and more important as a clinical tool. Susceptibility-weighted imaging has been commercialized by Siemens Healthcare under the acronym SWI. As of recently, Philips Healthcare offers the beta-version of a post-processing technique for susceptibility-weighting called PADRE (Phase difference Enhanced). The post-processing steps of PADRE have not yet been published.
Phantom experiment and volunteer studies were made to compare the two techniques qualitatively and... (More)
Susceptibility Weighted Imaging is an MRI- and post-processing technique that utilize the phase information from the MR signal to enhance the contrast in areas with different susceptibility than surrounding tissue in T2*-weighted images. This technique is becoming more and more important as a clinical tool. Susceptibility-weighted imaging has been commercialized by Siemens Healthcare under the acronym SWI. As of recently, Philips Healthcare offers the beta-version of a post-processing technique for susceptibility-weighting called PADRE (Phase difference Enhanced). The post-processing steps of PADRE have not yet been published.
Phantom experiment and volunteer studies were made to compare the two techniques qualitatively and quantitatively. A MATLAB program for SWI was written and the influence of different parameters used in acquisition and post-processing for SWI and PADRE was evaluated by quantifying contrast in the images.

Differences in post-processing between SWI and PADRE were shown by comparing the results of the implementations with the post-processing result of the MATLAB SWI program. Some differences in overall image quality and in contrast between the two techniques, as well as between two different pulse sequences used, were found. Contrast enhancement was shown to be higher for PADRE than for SWI in the phantom experiments. However, no significant difference between the two implementations could be shown when measuring CNR enhancement in a large number of veins in healthy volunteers. (Less)
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author
Eriksson, Stefanie
supervisor
organization
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
MRI
language
English
id
2277648
date added to LUP
2012-01-08 10:28:36
date last changed
2013-09-05 10:20:10
@misc{2277648,
  abstract     = {Susceptibility Weighted Imaging is an MRI- and post-processing technique that utilize the phase information from the MR signal to enhance the contrast in areas with different susceptibility than surrounding tissue in T2*-weighted images. This technique is becoming more and more important as a clinical tool. Susceptibility-weighted imaging has been commercialized by Siemens Healthcare under the acronym SWI. As of recently, Philips Healthcare offers the beta-version of a post-processing technique for susceptibility-weighting called PADRE (Phase difference Enhanced). The post-processing steps of PADRE have not yet been published.
Phantom experiment and volunteer studies were made to compare the two techniques qualitatively and quantitatively. A MATLAB program for SWI was written and the influence of different parameters used in acquisition and post-processing for SWI and PADRE was evaluated by quantifying contrast in the images.

Differences in post-processing between SWI and PADRE were shown by comparing the results of the implementations with the post-processing result of the MATLAB SWI program. Some differences in overall image quality and in contrast between the two techniques, as well as between two different pulse sequences used, were found. Contrast enhancement was shown to be higher for PADRE than for SWI in the phantom experiments. However, no significant difference between the two implementations could be shown when measuring CNR enhancement in a large number of veins in healthy volunteers.},
  author       = {Eriksson, Stefanie},
  keyword      = {MRI},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {A study of susceptibility-weighted MRI including a comparison of two different implementations},
  year         = {2011},
}