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Agents of Development or Agents of Fear? The Link Between Migration, Development, and Security in EU's Mobility Partnerships

Farner, Elisabet LU (2012) STVK12 20121
Department of Political Science
Abstract
Since the end of the Cold War, EU migration policy has been subjected to securitization, and migrants have been viewed as potential threats to European security and homogeneity. However, in recent years the migration-development nexus has experienced a renaissance. The benefits of migration have increasingly come to influence the policy agenda.
In this setting, the Global Approach to Migration developed as the new EU strategy for migration and asylum. In 2007, the European Commission pro-posed a new instrument for cooperation with third countries on migration -Mobility Partnerships. These partnerships are concluded with neighboring coun-tries willing to cooperate on migration-related issues specifically aimed at labor mobility. The EU... (More)
Since the end of the Cold War, EU migration policy has been subjected to securitization, and migrants have been viewed as potential threats to European security and homogeneity. However, in recent years the migration-development nexus has experienced a renaissance. The benefits of migration have increasingly come to influence the policy agenda.
In this setting, the Global Approach to Migration developed as the new EU strategy for migration and asylum. In 2007, the European Commission pro-posed a new instrument for cooperation with third countries on migration -Mobility Partnerships. These partnerships are concluded with neighboring coun-tries willing to cooperate on migration-related issues specifically aimed at labor mobility. The EU has, with the implementation of this new framework for migra-tion, made an effort to move away from a security-oriented agenda towards a more comprehensive migration policy.
This study investigates current literature on the migration-development nexus on one hand, and the migration-security nexus on the other. This discussion is then combined with a discourse analysis of two documents investigating the ap-proach towards Mobility Partnerships. The study finds that the Mobility Partner-ships addresses a security discourse more than a “global approach”. The analysis show that an underlying bias remains towards third countries and that a security discourse still exists in EU’s approach to migration. (Less)
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author
Farner, Elisabet LU
supervisor
organization
course
STVK12 20121
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
keywords
migration, securitization, development, EU, Mobility Partnerships
language
English
id
2544687
date added to LUP
2012-06-28 10:12:40
date last changed
2012-06-28 10:12:40
@misc{2544687,
  abstract     = {Since the end of the Cold War, EU migration policy has been subjected to securitization, and migrants have been viewed as potential threats to European security and homogeneity. However, in recent years the migration-development nexus has experienced a renaissance. The benefits of migration have increasingly come to influence the policy agenda. 
In this setting, the Global Approach to Migration developed as the new EU strategy for migration and asylum. In 2007, the European Commission pro-posed a new instrument for cooperation with third countries on migration -Mobility Partnerships. These partnerships are concluded with neighboring coun-tries willing to cooperate on migration-related issues specifically aimed at labor mobility. The EU has, with the implementation of this new framework for migra-tion, made an effort to move away from a security-oriented agenda towards a more comprehensive migration policy.
This study investigates current literature on the migration-development nexus on one hand, and the migration-security nexus on the other. This discussion is then combined with a discourse analysis of two documents investigating the ap-proach towards Mobility Partnerships. The study finds that the Mobility Partner-ships addresses a security discourse more than a “global approach”. The analysis show that an underlying bias remains towards third countries and that a security discourse still exists in EU’s approach to migration.},
  author       = {Farner, Elisabet},
  keyword      = {migration,securitization,development,EU,Mobility Partnerships},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Agents of Development or Agents of Fear? The Link Between Migration, Development, and Security in EU's Mobility Partnerships},
  year         = {2012},
}