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Measuring physiological parameters in mussels for use in freshwater monitoring

Ruderfelt, Linnea LU (2012) VVR820 20121
Division of Water Resources Engineering
Abstract
In this thesis the possibility of using mussels as a sensor for contaminants in drinking water intakes was evaluated. Oxygen consumption, heart rate and valve movement was measured upon exposure to oil, caffeine (a marker for waste water) and copper. Valve movement was measured both by time lapse recordings of the mussels and by attaching strain gauges to their shells. One species of freshwater mussels (Sinanodonta woodiana, Chinese pond mussel) and on species of salt water mussels (Mytilus edulis, blue mussel) was used. The freshwater mussels were obtained in the belief that they were of the species Anodonta cygnea native to Sweden. Sinanodonta woodiana is an invasive mussel species originating from China that is not advisable to use in... (More)
In this thesis the possibility of using mussels as a sensor for contaminants in drinking water intakes was evaluated. Oxygen consumption, heart rate and valve movement was measured upon exposure to oil, caffeine (a marker for waste water) and copper. Valve movement was measured both by time lapse recordings of the mussels and by attaching strain gauges to their shells. One species of freshwater mussels (Sinanodonta woodiana, Chinese pond mussel) and on species of salt water mussels (Mytilus edulis, blue mussel) was used. The freshwater mussels were obtained in the belief that they were of the species Anodonta cygnea native to Sweden. Sinanodonta woodiana is an invasive mussel species originating from China that is not advisable to use in Swedish water monitoring.

The results show that the best parameter to monitor is valve movement. The freshwater mussels responded to neither oil nor caffeine at concentrations low enough to suffice in monitoring of drinking water. They can also withstand high concentrations of copper. This might be due to that the invasive species has acquired higher tolerance to contamination. The blue mussels were tested to ensure the sensitivity of the method and they reacted to lower concentrations of copper. Since salt water is not used as a raw water source, blue mussels cannot be used for monitoring. A freshwater mussel species native to Sweden should be tried instead of Sinanodonta woodiana. Anodonta anatina, which is the most common freshwater mussel species in Sweden, might be a good example. (Less)
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author
Ruderfelt, Linnea LU
supervisor
organization
course
VVR820 20121
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Mytilus edulis, crude oil copper, caffeine., Sinanodonta woodiana, mussels, Biological early warning system
report number
TVVR 12/5017
ISSN
1101-9824
language
English
id
2860689
date added to LUP
2012-08-20 12:40:29
date last changed
2012-08-20 12:40:29
@misc{2860689,
  abstract     = {In this thesis the possibility of using mussels as a sensor for contaminants in drinking water intakes was evaluated. Oxygen consumption, heart rate and valve movement was measured upon exposure to oil, caffeine (a marker for waste water) and copper. Valve movement was measured both by time lapse recordings of the mussels and by attaching strain gauges to their shells. One species of freshwater mussels (Sinanodonta woodiana, Chinese pond mussel) and on species of salt water mussels (Mytilus edulis, blue mussel) was used. The freshwater mussels were obtained in the belief that they were of the species Anodonta cygnea native to Sweden. Sinanodonta woodiana is an invasive mussel species originating from China that is not advisable to use in Swedish water monitoring.

The results show that the best parameter to monitor is valve movement. The freshwater mussels responded to neither oil nor caffeine at concentrations low enough to suffice in monitoring of drinking water. They can also withstand high concentrations of copper. This might be due to that the invasive species has acquired higher tolerance to contamination. The blue mussels were tested to ensure the sensitivity of the method and they reacted to lower concentrations of copper. Since salt water is not used as a raw water source, blue mussels cannot be used for monitoring. A freshwater mussel species native to Sweden should be tried instead of Sinanodonta woodiana. Anodonta anatina, which is the most common freshwater mussel species in Sweden, might be a good example.},
  author       = {Ruderfelt, Linnea},
  issn         = {1101-9824},
  keyword      = {Mytilus edulis,crude oil copper,caffeine.,Sinanodonta woodiana,mussels,Biological early warning system},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Measuring physiological parameters in mussels for use in freshwater monitoring},
  year         = {2012},
}