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Tram Number Seven to Heaven : A Cultural Analysis of Trams for our Lives

Atherton, Stephen LU (2012) TKAM01 20111
Division of Ethnology
Abstract
This thesis addresses many issues surrounding the simple question: why have trams? With city populations exponentially growing alongside concerns over the environment and the economy, tramways have become a resurging form of sustainable transportation for municipalities. Once an endangered transportation mode, torn up and scrapped to make room for the age of cars, tramways are phoenix artifacts of city life and being chosen by municipalities across the world to once again inhabit and enliven city streets. Many studies have been done to document the cost effectiveness and environmental impact of trams; however, little has been written regarding the social impact trams have on people and cities. Why do people tend to ride trams more than... (More)
This thesis addresses many issues surrounding the simple question: why have trams? With city populations exponentially growing alongside concerns over the environment and the economy, tramways have become a resurging form of sustainable transportation for municipalities. Once an endangered transportation mode, torn up and scrapped to make room for the age of cars, tramways are phoenix artifacts of city life and being chosen by municipalities across the world to once again inhabit and enliven city streets. Many studies have been done to document the cost effectiveness and environmental impact of trams; however, little has been written regarding the social impact trams have on people and cities. Why do people tend to ride trams more than buses covering the same route? How does a tramline affect the street-life and culture around the network? How do trams shape the way people move and interact? Simply put, what benefits do trams bring to cities and our lives? Using primary research undertaken in 2011 along with an analysis of existing tram material, this paper seeks to understand the relationship that people have with trams, and the relationship trams have with people and cities. The theoretical framework considered in this writing draws from authors in the social science arena, as well as classic theorists in urban planning and architecture such as Clive Doucet, Patrick Condon, David Seamon, Orvar Löfren, Hans Glimell, Greg, Gormick, Donlyn Lyndon, and Jonas Frykman, among many others. (Less)
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author
Atherton, Stephen LU
supervisor
organization
course
TKAM01 20111
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Trams, Tramways, Streetcars, Trolleys, Public Transportation, Sociology, Ethnology, Urban Planning, Culture, Development, Infrastructure, Transport Sociology, User Experience.
language
English
additional info
Additional Thesis Advisor: Jessica Enevold

Author's Contact Information:
athertonstephen@gmail.com
id
2971979
date added to LUP
2012-08-20 08:45:24
date last changed
2012-08-20 08:45:24
@misc{2971979,
  abstract     = {This thesis addresses many issues surrounding the simple question: why have trams? With city populations exponentially growing alongside concerns over the environment and the economy, tramways have become a resurging form of sustainable transportation for municipalities. Once an endangered transportation mode, torn up and scrapped to make room for the age of cars, tramways are phoenix artifacts of city life and being chosen by municipalities across the world to once again inhabit and enliven city streets. Many studies have been done to document the cost effectiveness and environmental impact of trams; however, little has been written regarding the social impact trams have on people and cities. Why do people tend to ride trams more than buses covering the same route? How does a tramline affect the street-life and culture around the network? How do trams shape the way people move and interact? Simply put, what benefits do trams bring to cities and our lives? Using primary research undertaken in 2011 along with an analysis of existing tram material, this paper seeks to understand the relationship that people have with trams, and the relationship trams have with people and cities. The theoretical framework considered in this writing draws from authors in the social science arena, as well as classic theorists in urban planning and architecture such as Clive Doucet, Patrick Condon, David Seamon, Orvar Löfren, Hans Glimell, Greg, Gormick, Donlyn Lyndon, and Jonas Frykman, among many others.},
  author       = {Atherton, Stephen},
  keyword      = {Trams,Tramways,Streetcars,Trolleys,Public Transportation,Sociology,Ethnology,Urban Planning,Culture,Development,Infrastructure,Transport Sociology,User Experience.},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Tram Number Seven to Heaven : A Cultural Analysis of Trams for our Lives},
  year         = {2012},
}