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Varumärkesförfalskning - marknadsföring eller snålskjuts?

Andersson, Paulina LU ; Eriksson, Helena LU and Persson, Malin LU (2012) FEKH95 20112
Department of Business Administration
Abstract
Title: Counterfeit – marketing or free ride?
Seminar date: 12 januari 2012
Course: FEKH95, Degree Project Undergraduate level, Business Administration, Under graduate level, 15 University Credits Pints (UPC) or ECTS-cr)
Authors: Paulina Andersson, Helena Eriksson and Malin Persson
Advisor: Clara Gustafsson
Key words: Luxury, counterfeit items, consumers, influence, brand
Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate how the perception of brand image and value of potential customers of luxury products and brands changes negatively, when impacted of counterfeit products.
Methodology: A positivism scientific approach has been used. A quantitative method was used and a survey with 100 respondents was conducted, to use as a... (More)
Title: Counterfeit – marketing or free ride?
Seminar date: 12 januari 2012
Course: FEKH95, Degree Project Undergraduate level, Business Administration, Under graduate level, 15 University Credits Pints (UPC) or ECTS-cr)
Authors: Paulina Andersson, Helena Eriksson and Malin Persson
Advisor: Clara Gustafsson
Key words: Luxury, counterfeit items, consumers, influence, brand
Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate how the perception of brand image and value of potential customers of luxury products and brands changes negatively, when impacted of counterfeit products.
Methodology: A positivism scientific approach has been used. A quantitative method was used and a survey with 100 respondents was conducted, to use as a comparison against the theory.
Theoretical perspectives: Mainly Leibensteins theories has been used regarding the "Bandwagon effect" and "Snob Effect", Wood's definition of brands, Heine and Phan´s definition of luxury brands, and Grossman and Shapiro’s definition of counterfeit items.
Empirical foundation: A short presentation regarding the luxury brands selected for the survey, namely Burberry, Mulberry, Fendi and Louis Vuitton.
Conclusions: The conclusion is that a counterfeit goods partially affects the image of luxury goods, according to Leibsteins theory, because of demand redistribution. Demand is increasing in the lower income groups through over-exposure, which affects the image in a negative way among high earners, leading to lower propensity to buy this. The lower income group is increasing the positive perception of the brand and the propensity to buy, giving a net effect of demand that is zero. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Andersson, Paulina LU ; Eriksson, Helena LU and Persson, Malin LU
supervisor
organization
course
FEKH95 20112
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
keywords
Luxury, counterfeit items, consumers, influence, brand
language
Swedish
id
2972219
date added to LUP
2012-08-20 13:34:17
date last changed
2012-08-20 13:34:17
@misc{2972219,
  abstract     = {Title: Counterfeit – marketing or free ride?
Seminar date: 12 januari 2012
Course: FEKH95, Degree Project Undergraduate level, Business Administration, Under graduate level, 15 University Credits Pints (UPC) or ECTS-cr)
Authors: Paulina Andersson, Helena Eriksson and Malin Persson
Advisor: Clara Gustafsson
Key words: Luxury, counterfeit items, consumers, influence, brand
Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate how the perception of brand image and value of potential customers of luxury products and brands changes negatively, when impacted of counterfeit products.
Methodology: A positivism scientific approach has been used. A quantitative method was used and a survey with 100 respondents was conducted, to use as a comparison against the theory.
Theoretical perspectives: Mainly Leibensteins theories has been used regarding the "Bandwagon effect" and "Snob Effect", Wood's definition of brands, Heine and Phan´s definition of luxury brands, and Grossman and Shapiro’s definition of counterfeit items.
Empirical foundation: A short presentation regarding the luxury brands selected for the survey, namely Burberry, Mulberry, Fendi and Louis Vuitton.
Conclusions: The conclusion is that a counterfeit goods partially affects the image of luxury goods, according to Leibsteins theory, because of demand redistribution. Demand is increasing in the lower income groups through over-exposure, which affects the image in a negative way among high earners, leading to lower propensity to buy this. The lower income group is increasing the positive perception of the brand and the propensity to buy, giving a net effect of demand that is zero.},
  author       = {Andersson, Paulina and Eriksson, Helena and Persson, Malin},
  keyword      = {Luxury,counterfeit items,consumers,influence,brand},
  language     = {swe},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Varumärkesförfalskning - marknadsföring eller snålskjuts?},
  year         = {2012},
}