Advanced

Seeing the Forest for the Trees - Australian Forest Biomass for Energy: An Investigation of Understanding, Acceptance, Trust & Legitimacy

Ulrik, Kai LU (2012) In IIIEE Master thesis IMEN41 20122
The International Institute for Industrial Environmental Economics
Abstract
Forest biomass used in bioenergy systems, is a proven, large scale, cost-effective and growing renewable energy source in numerous countries. In Australia, the technical potential and environmental benefits of forest biomass for energy purposes are evident to many social and market actors, yet implementation is minimal. This work investigates a number of the underlying factors for the low implementation of forest derived bioenergy.
This paper works from a point of departure that bioenergy from forests has potential for economic, social and environmental merit, and that a major constraint is a lack of understanding and acceptance among important stakeholders. The analysis focuses on the views and attitudes towards utilising forest biomass... (More)
Forest biomass used in bioenergy systems, is a proven, large scale, cost-effective and growing renewable energy source in numerous countries. In Australia, the technical potential and environmental benefits of forest biomass for energy purposes are evident to many social and market actors, yet implementation is minimal. This work investigates a number of the underlying factors for the low implementation of forest derived bioenergy.
This paper works from a point of departure that bioenergy from forests has potential for economic, social and environmental merit, and that a major constraint is a lack of understanding and acceptance among important stakeholders. The analysis focuses on the views and attitudes towards utilising forest biomass for energy purposes in Australia - aiming to seek clarity into why forest biomass energy is not utilised in Australia; as it is internationally. This research seeks insights into why it is constrained, and how it can develop the legitimacy it needs if it is to contribute to Australia’s renewable energy mix. It considers an analysis of stakeholder salience and works within the institutional theory to explore the importance of stakeholder legitimacy in forest biomass for energy.
Findings indicate that implementing forest biomass for energy purposes in Australia has been overshadowed by disputes regarding Australian ‘native forests’ - which has damaged social acceptance of forest biomass and discredited bioenergy in Australia. This thesis concludes with tentative recommendations directed at developing greater understanding of forest biomass through product differentiation of bioenergy forms, and integrating regional forest biomass for energy applications to enhance social acceptance and a community licence for forest biomass use in Australia. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Ulrik, Kai LU
supervisor
organization
course
IMEN41 20122
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Forest Biomass, Wood Waste, Harvest Residue, Legitimacy, Social Acceptance
publication/series
IIIEE Master thesis
report number
2012:25
ISSN
1401-9191
language
English
id
3127141
date added to LUP
2012-10-08 10:44:21
date last changed
2012-10-08 14:29:29
@misc{3127141,
  abstract     = {Forest biomass used in bioenergy systems, is a proven, large scale, cost-effective and growing renewable energy source in numerous countries. In Australia, the technical potential and environmental benefits of forest biomass for energy purposes are evident to many social and market actors, yet implementation is minimal. This work investigates a number of the underlying factors for the low implementation of forest derived bioenergy.
This paper works from a point of departure that bioenergy from forests has potential for economic, social and environmental merit, and that a major constraint is a lack of understanding and acceptance among important stakeholders. The analysis focuses on the views and attitudes towards utilising forest biomass for energy purposes in Australia - aiming to seek clarity into why forest biomass energy is not utilised in Australia; as it is internationally. This research seeks insights into why it is constrained, and how it can develop the legitimacy it needs if it is to contribute to Australia’s renewable energy mix. It considers an analysis of stakeholder salience and works within the institutional theory to explore the importance of stakeholder legitimacy in forest biomass for energy.
Findings indicate that implementing forest biomass for energy purposes in Australia has been overshadowed by disputes regarding Australian ‘native forests’ - which has damaged social acceptance of forest biomass and discredited bioenergy in Australia. This thesis concludes with tentative recommendations directed at developing greater understanding of forest biomass through product differentiation of bioenergy forms, and integrating regional forest biomass for energy applications to enhance social acceptance and a community licence for forest biomass use in Australia.},
  author       = {Ulrik, Kai},
  issn         = {1401-9191},
  keyword      = {Forest Biomass,Wood Waste,Harvest Residue,Legitimacy,Social Acceptance},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  series       = {IIIEE Master thesis},
  title        = {Seeing the Forest for the Trees - Australian Forest Biomass for Energy: An Investigation of Understanding, Acceptance, Trust & Legitimacy},
  year         = {2012},
}