Advanced

The effect of dark matter capture on binary stars

Carrera, Daniel LU (2012) In Lund Observatory Examensarbeten ASTM31 20121
Lund Observatory
Department of Astronomy and Theoretical Physics
Abstract
WIMPs, orWeakly InteractingMassive Particles, are a popular dark matter
candidate, but their detection remains elusive. At its core, this project is
an effort to bridge the gap between the theory of WIMPs, and astronomical
observation.

According to the WIMP model, stars in the galaxy travel through a background
field of WIMPs that are constantly crossing the star. Some of these
WIMPs collide with atomic nuclei inside stars via the weak force interaction.
The ones that lose sufficient kinetic energy become bound to the star.
Captured WIMPs gradually accumulate inside the core of the star, where
they annihilate with each other. This converts the entire WIMP mass into
energy. A star that captures a significant number of WIMPs... (More)
WIMPs, orWeakly InteractingMassive Particles, are a popular dark matter
candidate, but their detection remains elusive. At its core, this project is
an effort to bridge the gap between the theory of WIMPs, and astronomical
observation.

According to the WIMP model, stars in the galaxy travel through a background
field of WIMPs that are constantly crossing the star. Some of these
WIMPs collide with atomic nuclei inside stars via the weak force interaction.
The ones that lose sufficient kinetic energy become bound to the star.
Captured WIMPs gradually accumulate inside the core of the star, where
they annihilate with each other. This converts the entire WIMP mass into
energy. A star that captures a significant number of WIMPs could receive
most of its energy from WIMP-WIMP annihilation. This would have dramatic
effects in the star’s structure and evolution, greatly prolonging its life.
The possibility of directly observing stars powered by WIMP annihilation
is the driving force behind this project.

In this project I have modelled collisions between WIMPs and atomic nuclei,
via the weak interaction. Combined with an N-body simulation, I have
been able to model WIMP capture in both single stars and binary systems.
This work has led to a number of interesting conclusions: (1) Binary stars,
due to their orbital motion, can produce more collisions that result in initially
bound orbits. However, the gravitational interaction with two masses
quickly scatters nearly all WIMPs out of the system. The few that survive,
end up in rosette-shaped orbits that do not pass through either star. As
a result, the WIMP capture rate in binaries is essentially zero. (2) These
semi-stable rosette orbits mean that stars in a binary are surrounded by
WIMP halos, with a much higher density than the background. These halos
will be a source of gamma ray radiation as WIMPs collide and annihilate.
Unfortunately, the resulting WIMP flux at the Earth is merely 4 × 10−5
photons m−2 yr−1 even in the most optimistic scenario. (3) Lastly, it is
highly unlikely that any WIMP-burning star (single or in a binary) can be
found anywhere in our galaxy. (Less)
Abstract (Swedish)
Det är numera allmänt vedertaget att 80% av materian i universum består av en ny sorts partiklar
som inte strålar eller interagerar med ljus. Med andra ord, den är ”mörk”. Vi känner redan
till en slags ”mörk” partikel - neutrinon. Alla partiklar som är elektriskt oladdade är
”mörka”, men mörk materia kan inte huvudsakligen bestå av neutriner. Mörk materia verkar
bestå av partiklar som är mycket mer massiva än några andra partiklar man känner till
idag - runt 100 gånger protonens massa.

Eftersom mörk materia inte interagerar med ljus är den väldigt svår att upptäcka och studera. Alla försök att upptäcka mörk materia förlitar sig på idén att den fortfarande kan interagera med vanlig materia på andra sätt. Framförallt att mörk... (More)
Det är numera allmänt vedertaget att 80% av materian i universum består av en ny sorts partiklar
som inte strålar eller interagerar med ljus. Med andra ord, den är ”mörk”. Vi känner redan
till en slags ”mörk” partikel - neutrinon. Alla partiklar som är elektriskt oladdade är
”mörka”, men mörk materia kan inte huvudsakligen bestå av neutriner. Mörk materia verkar
bestå av partiklar som är mycket mer massiva än några andra partiklar man känner till
idag - runt 100 gånger protonens massa.

Eftersom mörk materia inte interagerar med ljus är den väldigt svår att upptäcka och studera. Alla försök att upptäcka mörk materia förlitar sig på idén att den fortfarande kan interagera med vanlig materia på andra sätt. Framförallt att mörk materia kan kollidera med vanliga partiklar. Det finns många experiment över hela världen där man försöker upptäcka de här kollisionerna, men än så länge har inget av dem lyckats.

Det här projektet är ett försök att utveckla ett annat sätt att upptäcka mörk materia, nämligen genom att undersöka dess effekt på dubbelstjärnor. När partiklar av mörk materia kolliderar med väteatomer inuti en stjärna förlorar de fart och kan bli fångade av stjärnans gravitation. Om en stjärna samlar på sig tillräckligt mycket mörk materia kan det ändra stjärnans struktur på ett observerbart sätt. T.ex. skulle partiklar av mörk materia troligtvis förstöras genom annihilation mellan materia och antimateria och därmed bidra med
energi till stjärnan. Denna extra energikälla skulle tillåta en stjärna att leva, i princip, för evigt. Den här sortens stjärnor, drivna av mörk materia, skulle man kunna känna igen om man såg dem genom ett teleskop.

Jag har använt datorsimuleringar för att göra modeller av hur dubbelstjärnor fångar in mörk materia. Problemet är komplicerat eftersom gravitationen från de två stjärnorna skapar komplicerade banor för partiklarna. Tyvärr visar mina resultat att dubbelstjärnor fångar in ännu mindre mörk materia än vad ensamma stjärnor gör. Dessutom, även under de mest optimistiska
förhållandena finns det antagligen inte några stjärnor i vår galax som har samlat in tillräckligt mycket mörk materia för att det ska ge en synbar effekt. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Carrera, Daniel LU
supervisor
organization
course
ASTM31 20121
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
publication/series
Lund Observatory Examensarbeten
report number
2012-EXA63
language
English
id
3242612
date added to LUP
2012-12-17 12:33:05
date last changed
2012-12-17 12:33:05
@misc{3242612,
  abstract     = {WIMPs, orWeakly InteractingMassive Particles, are a popular dark matter
candidate, but their detection remains elusive. At its core, this project is
an effort to bridge the gap between the theory of WIMPs, and astronomical
observation.

According to the WIMP model, stars in the galaxy travel through a background
field of WIMPs that are constantly crossing the star. Some of these
WIMPs collide with atomic nuclei inside stars via the weak force interaction.
The ones that lose sufficient kinetic energy become bound to the star.
Captured WIMPs gradually accumulate inside the core of the star, where
they annihilate with each other. This converts the entire WIMP mass into
energy. A star that captures a significant number of WIMPs could receive
most of its energy from WIMP-WIMP annihilation. This would have dramatic
effects in the star’s structure and evolution, greatly prolonging its life.
The possibility of directly observing stars powered by WIMP annihilation
is the driving force behind this project.

In this project I have modelled collisions between WIMPs and atomic nuclei,
via the weak interaction. Combined with an N-body simulation, I have
been able to model WIMP capture in both single stars and binary systems.
This work has led to a number of interesting conclusions: (1) Binary stars,
due to their orbital motion, can produce more collisions that result in initially
bound orbits. However, the gravitational interaction with two masses
quickly scatters nearly all WIMPs out of the system. The few that survive,
end up in rosette-shaped orbits that do not pass through either star. As
a result, the WIMP capture rate in binaries is essentially zero. (2) These
semi-stable rosette orbits mean that stars in a binary are surrounded by
WIMP halos, with a much higher density than the background. These halos
will be a source of gamma ray radiation as WIMPs collide and annihilate.
Unfortunately, the resulting WIMP flux at the Earth is merely 4 × 10−5
photons m−2 yr−1 even in the most optimistic scenario. (3) Lastly, it is
highly unlikely that any WIMP-burning star (single or in a binary) can be
found anywhere in our galaxy.},
  author       = {Carrera, Daniel},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  series       = {Lund Observatory Examensarbeten},
  title        = {The effect of dark matter capture on binary stars},
  year         = {2012},
}