Skip to main content

LUP Student Papers

LUND UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES

Identity construction of immigrant students in Iceland, a comparative case study at two sites

Gautadóttir, Hrund LU (2013) SIMV15 20131
Graduate School
Abstract
The aim of this study was to use case study approach to show educators that identities of immigrant students are complex, and a response to the dominant culture. The cases were four immigrant students in grades 8 to 10 in Iceland. Through interviews, and observations, data was gathered on how the students construct their identities in the school con-text, with a focus on teachers’ expectations. The cases and teachers that knew them well, were interviewed with semi-structured interviews. The results were interpreted through an intersectional lens, with a focus on gender, class and eth-nicity/race, combined with Bourdieu’s concepts of capital and social field. Three different typologies of ethnic adapta-tion were also used; ethnic flight,... (More)
The aim of this study was to use case study approach to show educators that identities of immigrant students are complex, and a response to the dominant culture. The cases were four immigrant students in grades 8 to 10 in Iceland. Through interviews, and observations, data was gathered on how the students construct their identities in the school con-text, with a focus on teachers’ expectations. The cases and teachers that knew them well, were interviewed with semi-structured interviews. The results were interpreted through an intersectional lens, with a focus on gender, class and eth-nicity/race, combined with Bourdieu’s concepts of capital and social field. Three different typologies of ethnic adapta-tion were also used; ethnic flight, adversarial identity and transcultural identity. The data supports that identity is flexible and changeable, and that it is based on the students´ response to the dominant culture. The findings suggest that it does not matter how the students’ position themselves, how good their language is, or how much they try to fit in, they are always seen as outsiders. Teachers must look be-yond stereotypes and get to know their students as individu-als. In lower secondary school in Iceland different teachers teach each subject, which makes it difficult for them to have a complete picture of their students. Cooperation and infor-mation sharing between teachers is very important. The school is in a power position and must take the native culture into account, and avoid seeing it as negative. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Gautadóttir, Hrund LU
supervisor
organization
course
SIMV15 20131
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Immigrant students, teachers’ expectations, identity, intersectionality, Bourdieu, adaptation styles
language
English
id
3807536
date added to LUP
2013-06-19 08:08:20
date last changed
2013-06-19 08:08:20
@misc{3807536,
  abstract     = {The aim of this study was to use case study approach to show educators that identities of immigrant students are complex, and a response to the dominant culture. The cases were four immigrant students in grades 8 to 10 in Iceland. Through interviews, and observations, data was gathered on how the students construct their identities in the school con-text, with a focus on teachers’ expectations. The cases and teachers that knew them well, were interviewed with semi-structured interviews. The results were interpreted through an intersectional lens, with a focus on gender, class and eth-nicity/race, combined with Bourdieu’s concepts of capital and social field. Three different typologies of ethnic adapta-tion were also used; ethnic flight, adversarial identity and transcultural identity. The data supports that identity is flexible and changeable, and that it is based on the students´ response to the dominant culture. The findings suggest that it does not matter how the students’ position themselves, how good their language is, or how much they try to fit in, they are always seen as outsiders. Teachers must look be-yond stereotypes and get to know their students as individu-als. In lower secondary school in Iceland different teachers teach each subject, which makes it difficult for them to have a complete picture of their students. Cooperation and infor-mation sharing between teachers is very important. The school is in a power position and must take the native culture into account, and avoid seeing it as negative.},
  author       = {Gautadóttir, Hrund},
  keyword      = {Immigrant students,teachers’ expectations,identity,intersectionality,Bourdieu,adaptation styles},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Identity construction of immigrant students in Iceland, a comparative case study at two sites},
  year         = {2013},
}