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Suppressing behaviour related to discomfort induced with a cold pressure task does not influence working memory capacity in a 2-back task.

Danielski, Erik LU (2013) PSYP01 20131
Department of Psychology
Abstract
The study aims to examine the impact of Expressive Suppression (ES), on Working Memory (WM) performance when exposed to mild pain reaction causing physiological activation. Performance measures are obtained to discriminate between three groups having their hands in warm water, cold water, and cold water and implementing ES. As a measure of WM performance, this study used a WM 2-back task interspersed with emotionally positive, negative and neutral faces. This study predicted the detrimental effect in WM performance when implementing ES, in line with previous studies suggesting that suppressing behaviour is cognitively effortful (Richards and Gross, 2000). However, in contrast to our predictions, our results indicate no trade off in... (More)
The study aims to examine the impact of Expressive Suppression (ES), on Working Memory (WM) performance when exposed to mild pain reaction causing physiological activation. Performance measures are obtained to discriminate between three groups having their hands in warm water, cold water, and cold water and implementing ES. As a measure of WM performance, this study used a WM 2-back task interspersed with emotionally positive, negative and neutral faces. This study predicted the detrimental effect in WM performance when implementing ES, in line with previous studies suggesting that suppressing behaviour is cognitively effortful (Richards and Gross, 2000). However, in contrast to our predictions, our results indicate no trade off in accuracy measures processing information in the 2-back task while simultaneously implementing ES. In addition, subjective ratings using the SAM-scale (Bradley & Lang, 1994) were gathered and the discomfort-related behavioural data rated by an independent group of students. The SAM-scale data suggest that being exposed to cold water CPT evoked less positive affect but not when implementing ES on CPT. Objective ratings suggest that there was a difference in participants behaviour and that implementing ES resulted in lower dispositional behaviour. Qualitative results also contribute to our understanding of the impact ES has on WM, even though they can be questioned. Therefore alternative explanations are discussed and manipulation implementation is questioned. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Danielski, Erik LU
supervisor
organization
alternative title
Suppressing behaviour does not influence working memory capacity
course
PSYP01 20131
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Emotion, Emotion Regulation, Expressive Suppression, Working Memory
language
English
id
3809421
date added to LUP
2013-06-19 16:39:01
date last changed
2013-06-19 16:39:01
@misc{3809421,
  abstract     = {The study aims to examine the impact of Expressive Suppression (ES), on Working Memory (WM) performance when exposed to mild pain reaction causing physiological activation. Performance measures are obtained to discriminate between three groups having their hands in warm water, cold water, and cold water and implementing ES. As a measure of WM performance, this study used a WM 2-back task interspersed with emotionally positive, negative and neutral faces. This study predicted the detrimental effect in WM performance when implementing ES, in line with previous studies suggesting that suppressing behaviour is cognitively effortful (Richards and Gross, 2000). However, in contrast to our predictions, our results indicate no trade off in accuracy measures processing information in the 2-back task while simultaneously implementing ES. In addition, subjective ratings using the SAM-scale (Bradley & Lang, 1994) were gathered and the discomfort-related behavioural data rated by an independent group of students. The SAM-scale data suggest that being exposed to cold water CPT evoked less positive affect but not when implementing ES on CPT. Objective ratings suggest that there was a difference in participants behaviour and that implementing ES resulted in lower dispositional behaviour. Qualitative results also contribute to our understanding of the impact ES has on WM, even though they can be questioned. Therefore alternative explanations are discussed and manipulation implementation is questioned.},
  author       = {Danielski, Erik},
  keyword      = {Emotion,Emotion Regulation,Expressive Suppression,Working Memory},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Suppressing behaviour related to discomfort induced with a cold pressure task does not influence working memory capacity in a 2-back task.},
  year         = {2013},
}