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Academic spin-off formation failure: the role of individual goals and attributions in learning from failure

Hendrickx, Raffaello and Simcikova, Klara LU (2013) ENTN19 20131
Department of Business Administration
Abstract
Failure in entrepreneurial initiatives is often considered beneficial for entrepreneurial learning, as entrepreneurs learn from such experience through reflection on why it occurred. However, the actors involved are heterogeneous, implying they may interpret failure differently, and, consequently, their learning outcomes may also differ. Using attribution theory as the main theoretical framework, this paper examines the failure in academic spin-off projects, characterized by the presence of both of two distinct groups of actors – researchers and entrepreneurs. A case study on a terminated entrepreneurial project is conducted. The data for which was obtained through the use of semi-structured interviews with the individuals involved. The... (More)
Failure in entrepreneurial initiatives is often considered beneficial for entrepreneurial learning, as entrepreneurs learn from such experience through reflection on why it occurred. However, the actors involved are heterogeneous, implying they may interpret failure differently, and, consequently, their learning outcomes may also differ. Using attribution theory as the main theoretical framework, this paper examines the failure in academic spin-off projects, characterized by the presence of both of two distinct groups of actors – researchers and entrepreneurs. A case study on a terminated entrepreneurial project is conducted. The data for which was obtained through the use of semi-structured interviews with the individuals involved. The findings are that attribution of failure is related to the individual level to a greater extent than to the actor’s role within the team. Attributions seem to be primarily external and, contrary to theory, external attributions appear to instigate learning. The link between external attributions and preserved future motivation to enter entrepreneurship is confirmed. The overarching conclusion points to the importance of individual goals and expectations: these determine how failure is interpreted and reflected on by an individual, and are essential for entrepreneurial learning. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Hendrickx, Raffaello and Simcikova, Klara LU
supervisor
organization
course
ENTN19 20131
year
type
H1 - Master's Degree (One Year)
subject
keywords
entrepreneurial learning, failure, attribution theory, academic spin-off projects, individual goals
language
English
id
3812511
date added to LUP
2013-06-13 11:03:41
date last changed
2013-06-13 11:03:41
@misc{3812511,
  abstract     = {Failure in entrepreneurial initiatives is often considered beneficial for entrepreneurial learning, as entrepreneurs learn from such experience through reflection on why it occurred. However, the actors involved are heterogeneous, implying they may interpret failure differently, and, consequently, their learning outcomes may also differ. Using attribution theory as the main theoretical framework, this paper examines the failure in academic spin-off projects, characterized by the presence of both of two distinct groups of actors – researchers and entrepreneurs. A case study on a terminated entrepreneurial project is conducted. The data for which was obtained through the use of semi-structured interviews with the individuals involved. The findings are that attribution of failure is related to the individual level to a greater extent than to the actor’s role within the team. Attributions seem to be primarily external and, contrary to theory, external attributions appear to instigate learning. The link between external attributions and preserved future motivation to enter entrepreneurship is confirmed. The overarching conclusion points to the importance of individual goals and expectations: these determine how failure is interpreted and reflected on by an individual, and are essential for entrepreneurial learning.},
  author       = {Hendrickx, Raffaello and Simcikova, Klara},
  keyword      = {entrepreneurial learning,failure,attribution theory,academic spin-off projects,individual goals},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Academic spin-off formation failure: the role of individual goals and attributions in learning from failure},
  year         = {2013},
}