Advanced

Deforestation and carbon stocks in Africa

Kosemani, Bosede Adenike (2011) In Lunds universitets Naturgeografiska institution - Seminar series NGEM01 20101
Dept of Physical Geography and Ecosystem Science
Abstract (Swedish)
Scientific summary
Deforestation has been recognized as the second largest source of anthropogenic carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. Carbon stocks play an important role in the global carbon cycle and global climate. The effect of deforestation on carbon stocks is of great concern to all stakeholders. Understanding the relationship between the rate of deforestation and loss in biomass is critical in understanding the role of Africa in the global carbon cycle. To investigate the effect of deforestation on the present and potential carbon stock in Africa, this study used data from the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Vegetation Continuous Field (VCF)... (More)
Scientific summary
Deforestation has been recognized as the second largest source of anthropogenic carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. Carbon stocks play an important role in the global carbon cycle and global climate. The effect of deforestation on carbon stocks is of great concern to all stakeholders. Understanding the relationship between the rate of deforestation and loss in biomass is critical in understanding the role of Africa in the global carbon cycle. To investigate the effect of deforestation on the present and potential carbon stock in Africa, this study used data from the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Vegetation Continuous Field (VCF) MOD44B, and biomass from Lund-Potsdam-Jena- Generalized Ecosystem Simulator (LPJ-GUESS) to map the temporal and spatial distribution of biomass in Africa. The data was re-gridded to 1° x 1° cell size to calculate the carbon stock held per grid cell which shows a pattern of carbon stock variation from 2001 to 2030.
The performed analysis indicates changes in carbon stock distribution over space and time due to deforestation; the estimated total biomass for 2001, 2015 and 2030 is 1.7 x1011, 1.85 x1011 and 2.1x1011 tons Carbon (C) respectively. Total biomass for the continent is concentrated in Middle Africa, along the coasts of western Africa and Madagascar. Most of the biomass observed is held in trees which hold the largest pool of carbon in Africa. This implies that trees sequester more carbon from the atmosphere than grasses. Although, there was an observed increase in grass carbon stock from 5.96 x 1010, 6.89 x 1010 and 8.29 x 1010 tons C in 2001, 2015 and 2030 respectively. This study improved the current understanding of the impact land use change (deforestation) has on the spatial and temporal distribution of carbon stocks in Africa. The study would enhance mitigation strategies as to the potential sources and sinks of carbon to the atmosphere. (Less)
Abstract (Swedish)
Popular summary
Deforestation has been recognized globally as the second largest source of Human-induced release of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. Carbon stored in trees is important in the global carbon cycle and affects the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. The process of deforestation takes place when man clears forested land. The amount of carbon stored in forested areas is large compared to the replacing area. When forested area is cleared and converted into anything but forest, the carbon stored in these trees are released (if burnt) or stored in the soil (if buried) and this affects the contribution to climate change.
In a bid to understand how deforestation affects the present and potential carbon stocks in Africa... (More)
Popular summary
Deforestation has been recognized globally as the second largest source of Human-induced release of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. Carbon stored in trees is important in the global carbon cycle and affects the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. The process of deforestation takes place when man clears forested land. The amount of carbon stored in forested areas is large compared to the replacing area. When forested area is cleared and converted into anything but forest, the carbon stored in these trees are released (if burnt) or stored in the soil (if buried) and this affects the contribution to climate change.
In a bid to understand how deforestation affects the present and potential carbon stocks in Africa were analysed by a simulation model. Data from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and satellite data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) were used in combination with the ecosystem model from Lund-Potsdam-Jena- Generalized Ecosystem Simulator (LPJ-GUESS). The model estimated the carbon stock in trees and grasses. The results was presented to show the changes in time and space for the period of 2001 to 2030.
The results showed that there was in general a decline in the amount of carbon stored in trees. The amount of grass in African countries increased because it was assumed that grasses would replace the forests. Most of the carbon stocks in trees is concentrated in Central Africa, along the coasts of West Africa and Madagascar. The results also implied that trees sequester more carbon from the atmosphere than grasses. This study improved the current understanding of the impact land use change (deforestation) has on the spatial and temporal distribution of carbon stocks in Africa. The study would enhance mitigation strategies as to the potential sources and sinks of carbon to the atmosphere. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Kosemani, Bosede Adenike
supervisor
organization
course
NGEM01 20101
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Deforestation, Carbon stock, Carbon cycle, MODIS VCF, LPJ-GUESS, FAO, Africa
publication/series
Lunds universitets Naturgeografiska institution - Seminar series
report number
226
funder
Erasmus Mundus Programme
language
English
additional info
Funder: Erasmus Mundus Lot 10: European Union Scholarship
id
3910535
date added to LUP
2013-06-27 12:14:35
date last changed
2013-06-27 12:14:35
@misc{3910535,
  abstract     = {Popular summary
Deforestation has been recognized globally as the second largest source of Human-induced release of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. Carbon stored in trees is important in the global carbon cycle and affects the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. The process of deforestation takes place when man clears forested land. The amount of carbon stored in forested areas is large compared to the replacing area. When forested area is cleared and converted into anything but forest, the carbon stored in these trees are released (if burnt) or stored in the soil (if buried) and this affects the contribution to climate change.
In a bid to understand how deforestation affects the present and potential carbon stocks in Africa were analysed by a simulation model. Data from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and satellite data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) were used in combination with the ecosystem model from Lund-Potsdam-Jena- Generalized Ecosystem Simulator (LPJ-GUESS). The model estimated the carbon stock in trees and grasses. The results was presented to show the changes in time and space for the period of 2001 to 2030.
The results showed that there was in general a decline in the amount of carbon stored in trees. The amount of grass in African countries increased because it was assumed that grasses would replace the forests. Most of the carbon stocks in trees is concentrated in Central Africa, along the coasts of West Africa and Madagascar. The results also implied that trees sequester more carbon from the atmosphere than grasses. This study improved the current understanding of the impact land use change (deforestation) has on the spatial and temporal distribution of carbon stocks in Africa. The study would enhance mitigation strategies as to the potential sources and sinks of carbon to the atmosphere.},
  author       = {Kosemani, Bosede Adenike},
  keyword      = {Deforestation,Carbon stock,Carbon cycle,MODIS VCF,LPJ-GUESS,FAO,Africa},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  series       = {Lunds universitets Naturgeografiska institution - Seminar series},
  title        = {Deforestation and carbon stocks in Africa},
  year         = {2011},
}