Skip to main content

LUP Student Papers

LUND UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES

A corpus-driven usage-feature analysis of the concept "Fate" in modern Russian and American English languages

L'Nyavskiy, Svetlana LU (2013) ENGK01 20122
English Studies
Abstract
The results of Multiple Correspondence Analysis suggest that regardless of
changes in perception of ‘FATE’ in American and Russian cultures during
the last two centuries, the main distinctions such as perception of ‘FATE’ as
Deterministic but Non-Agentive (things may happen but it is up to an individual
to take charge) in American culture and Deterministic and Agentive
in Russian culture (things happen and one has to accept it as a burden) remain
present and are still significant for the modern language users. American-
English language users tend to relate to Justification of ‘FATE’ as neutral
and Russian ones as more unjust. In relation to Axiology, English
lexemes fate, destiny and fortune tend to gravitate toward positive ways... (More)
The results of Multiple Correspondence Analysis suggest that regardless of
changes in perception of ‘FATE’ in American and Russian cultures during
the last two centuries, the main distinctions such as perception of ‘FATE’ as
Deterministic but Non-Agentive (things may happen but it is up to an individual
to take charge) in American culture and Deterministic and Agentive
in Russian culture (things happen and one has to accept it as a burden) remain
present and are still significant for the modern language users. American-
English language users tend to relate to Justification of ‘FATE’ as neutral
and Russian ones as more unjust. In relation to Axiology, English
lexemes fate, destiny and fortune tend to gravitate toward positive ways of
describing fate, while all Russian lexemes, except the lexeme ‘fate’ which
shows to be in between of those polarities, demonstrate their tendency to be
used in the description of the negative sides of fate. Both cultures tend to
personify ‘FATE’. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
L'Nyavskiy, Svetlana LU
supervisor
organization
course
ENGK01 20122
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
keywords
cultural linguistic analysis, usage-feature analysis, corpus, concept fate, objectification, multiple correspondence analysis, hierarchical cluster analysis, logistic regression
language
English
id
3957576
date added to LUP
2013-12-19 12:39:30
date last changed
2013-12-19 12:39:30
@misc{3957576,
  abstract     = {The results of Multiple Correspondence Analysis suggest that regardless of
changes in perception of ‘FATE’ in American and Russian cultures during
the last two centuries, the main distinctions such as perception of ‘FATE’ as
Deterministic but Non-Agentive (things may happen but it is up to an individual
to take charge) in American culture and Deterministic and Agentive
in Russian culture (things happen and one has to accept it as a burden) remain
present and are still significant for the modern language users. American-
English language users tend to relate to Justification of ‘FATE’ as neutral
and Russian ones as more unjust. In relation to Axiology, English
lexemes fate, destiny and fortune tend to gravitate toward positive ways of
describing fate, while all Russian lexemes, except the lexeme ‘fate’ which
shows to be in between of those polarities, demonstrate their tendency to be
used in the description of the negative sides of fate. Both cultures tend to
personify ‘FATE’.},
  author       = {L'Nyavskiy, Svetlana},
  keyword      = {cultural linguistic analysis,usage-feature analysis,corpus,concept fate,objectification,multiple correspondence analysis,hierarchical cluster analysis,logistic regression},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {A corpus-driven usage-feature analysis of the concept "Fate" in modern Russian and American English languages},
  year         = {2013},
}