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Escaping the Hermit Kingdom An : analysis of China’s policy towards North Korean Refugees

Petersson, Catherine LU (2013) MRSK30 20121
Human Rights Studies
Abstract
This paper deals with the issue of migration between North Korea and China. North Korea does not grant its citizens the legal right to freedom of movement, but famine and poverty has forced many to attempt escape through China, hoping to eventually reach South Korea. Those caught attempting to leave are punished in forced labour prisons, or sometimes executed. Satellite images have revealed North Korea’s extensive network of prison camps, known as kwan-li-so.
China categorises North Koreans as economic migrants, illegally present, despite a valid fear of persecution. They are not recognized as refugees and China continues to breach the non-refoulement principle, turning them over to the North Korean authorities. Additionally, there is... (More)
This paper deals with the issue of migration between North Korea and China. North Korea does not grant its citizens the legal right to freedom of movement, but famine and poverty has forced many to attempt escape through China, hoping to eventually reach South Korea. Those caught attempting to leave are punished in forced labour prisons, or sometimes executed. Satellite images have revealed North Korea’s extensive network of prison camps, known as kwan-li-so.
China categorises North Koreans as economic migrants, illegally present, despite a valid fear of persecution. They are not recognized as refugees and China continues to breach the non-refoulement principle, turning them over to the North Korean authorities. Additionally, there is no process in place to determine the status of North Koreans and they are denied contact with UNHCR. Both states have failed to protect this group of people, and fundamental human rights are neglected. In this situation, human rights exist in relation to the state. As outsiders, the North Korean refugees lose their human rights and both states dehumanise them. (Less)
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author
Petersson, Catherine LU
supervisor
organization
course
MRSK30 20121
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
keywords
non-reofoulement, North Korea, China, refugees, asylum, mänskliga rättigheter, human rights
language
English
id
3994642
date added to LUP
2013-10-22 07:44:35
date last changed
2014-09-04 08:27:44
@misc{3994642,
  abstract     = {This paper deals with the issue of migration between North Korea and China. North Korea does not grant its citizens the legal right to freedom of movement, but famine and poverty has forced many to attempt escape through China, hoping to eventually reach South Korea. Those caught attempting to leave are punished in forced labour prisons, or sometimes executed. Satellite images have revealed North Korea’s extensive network of prison camps, known as kwan-li-so. 
	China categorises North Koreans as economic migrants, illegally present, despite a valid fear of persecution. They are not recognized as refugees and China continues to breach the non-refoulement principle, turning them over to the North Korean authorities. Additionally, there is no process in place to determine the status of North Koreans and they are denied contact with UNHCR. Both states have failed to protect this group of people, and fundamental human rights are neglected. In this situation, human rights exist in relation to the state. As outsiders, the North Korean refugees lose their human rights and both states dehumanise them.},
  author       = {Petersson, Catherine},
  keyword      = {non-reofoulement,North Korea,China,refugees,asylum,mänskliga rättigheter,human rights},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Escaping the Hermit Kingdom An : analysis of China’s policy towards North Korean Refugees},
  year         = {2013},
}