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Socialtjänstens arbete med våldsamma pappor

Fjällström, Anna LU (2013) SOPA63 20131
School of Social Work
Abstract
Social services work with violent fathers

The objective of this study was to review and analyze how social workers, employed by the Swedish social services, work with fathers that are domestically violent and to discuss their views and perceptions on this issue. Domestic violence is traditionally considered a private matter, and in the past has largely not been considered a child protection issue. In the last 10 years there has been a growth in developing treatment programmes with men that are fathers. Since this intervention approach is still largely in its infancy it is interesting to assess how social service professionals have responded to this change and how the treatment programmes are constructed. The study involved a qualitative... (More)
Social services work with violent fathers

The objective of this study was to review and analyze how social workers, employed by the Swedish social services, work with fathers that are domestically violent and to discuss their views and perceptions on this issue. Domestic violence is traditionally considered a private matter, and in the past has largely not been considered a child protection issue. In the last 10 years there has been a growth in developing treatment programmes with men that are fathers. Since this intervention approach is still largely in its infancy it is interesting to assess how social service professionals have responded to this change and how the treatment programmes are constructed. The study involved a qualitative method which employed a semi-structured interview technique; six interviews with professionals working in the Swedish social service in southern regions of Sweden. After this initial acquisition of data I applied the theories of social constructionism and New Institutionalism. The findings from this study show treatment programmes and attitudes to violent men are continually evolving within the respondent's Kommun. However, it has also been noted that the concept of integrating all members of the family when considering the impact of the violence has not been fully implemented. The feedback implies violent fathers are still, to some extent, invisible in the work against domestic violence. My findings also show empirical evidence that indicates political decisions significantly influence the design and development of social care targeting violent fathers. This means development within this field is dependent heavily on socio-economic priorities. The majority of care workers I interviewed also adopted a strategy focused on engaging the individual as a father in order to generate intrinsic motivation to support and expedite the treatment process. However, identifying them as fathers is employed as a motivational incentive and not an integral aspect of the treatment which largely focuses on their violent conduct. It is also interesting to note that my research strongly suggests those interviewed adopt treatment strategy's inspired by Per Isdal's model ATV (Alternative to Violence). (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Fjällström, Anna LU
supervisor
organization
course
SOPA63 20131
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
keywords
domestic violence and child welfare, maltreating fathers, interventions
language
Swedish
id
4004995
date added to LUP
2013-09-03 08:46:50
date last changed
2013-09-03 08:46:50
@misc{4004995,
  abstract     = {Social services work with violent fathers

The objective of this study was to review and analyze how social workers, employed by the Swedish social services, work with fathers that are domestically violent and to discuss their views and perceptions on this issue. Domestic violence is traditionally considered a private matter, and in the past has largely not been considered a child protection issue. In the last 10 years there has been a growth in developing treatment programmes with men that are fathers. Since this intervention approach is still largely in its infancy it is interesting to assess how social service professionals have responded to this change and how the treatment programmes are constructed. The study involved a qualitative method which employed a semi-structured interview technique; six interviews with professionals working in the Swedish social service in southern regions of Sweden. After this initial acquisition of data I applied the theories of social constructionism and New Institutionalism. The findings from this study show treatment programmes and attitudes to violent men are continually evolving within the respondent's Kommun. However, it has also been noted that the concept of integrating all members of the family when considering the impact of the violence has not been fully implemented. The feedback implies violent fathers are still, to some extent, invisible in the work against domestic violence. My findings also show empirical evidence that indicates political decisions significantly influence the design and development of social care targeting violent fathers. This means development within this field is dependent heavily on socio-economic priorities. The majority of care workers I interviewed also adopted a strategy focused on engaging the individual as a father in order to generate intrinsic motivation to support and expedite the treatment process. However, identifying them as fathers is employed as a motivational incentive and not an integral aspect of the treatment which largely focuses on their violent conduct. It is also interesting to note that my research strongly suggests those interviewed adopt treatment strategy's inspired by Per Isdal's model ATV (Alternative to Violence).},
  author       = {Fjällström, Anna},
  keyword      = {domestic violence and child welfare,maltreating fathers,interventions},
  language     = {swe},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Socialtjänstens arbete med våldsamma pappor},
  year         = {2013},
}