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"If this is the future, where's my mobilitypack? Drivers, barriers and enabling factors for the mainstreaming of integrated mobility services in Europe

Harper, Nicole LU (2013) In IIIEE Master thesis IMEN41 20132
The International Institute for Industrial Environmental Economics
Abstract
Recent years have seen an explosion in innovative and sustainable mobility service offerings, especially car sharing and bike sharing. The latter contribute to sustainability by reducing individual car ownership, which has negative social, economic and especially environmental consequences. Yet, both industrial and academic discourses point out that no single mobility service is enough to meet the growing challenges presented by complex urban transport problems. Therefore not only new but also combined forms of services should be considered as part of a “full mobility package” in today’s smarter, more sustainable European cities. Although the literature is rich concerning the “what” and “why” of integrated mobility service (IMS) systems,... (More)
Recent years have seen an explosion in innovative and sustainable mobility service offerings, especially car sharing and bike sharing. The latter contribute to sustainability by reducing individual car ownership, which has negative social, economic and especially environmental consequences. Yet, both industrial and academic discourses point out that no single mobility service is enough to meet the growing challenges presented by complex urban transport problems. Therefore not only new but also combined forms of services should be considered as part of a “full mobility package” in today’s smarter, more sustainable European cities. Although the literature is rich concerning the “what” and “why” of integrated mobility service (IMS) systems, there is much to be desired in terms of the “how”, or the operationalizing and mainstreaming of IMS. European cities are seemingly equipped with all the pieces of the integration puzzle, but fitting them together in a resource efficient, cost-effective and environmentally sound way presents considerable challenges. Furthermore, few examples of IMS product-service systems exist in practice. To fill these research gaps, this exploratory thesis seeks to generate critical knowledge by identifying the major drivers, barriers and enabling factors for the mainstreaming of integrated mobility services into the European market. Three case examples are presented in an attempt to determine best practices, and distinguish key catalysts and obstacles facing the proliferation mobility servicizing in Europe. Product-service system theory is used as an analytical basis from which to understand and map this emerging field and associated frameworks are used to analyze and suggest ways of overcoming barriers facing integration. The study concludes by discussing the future of European integrated mobility services and makes suggestions for further research. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Harper, Nicole LU
supervisor
organization
course
IMEN41 20132
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
combined mobility, integrated transport, mobility management, sustainable transport, mobility servicizing
publication/series
IIIEE Master thesis
report number
2013:18
ISSN
1401-9191
language
English
id
4091623
date added to LUP
2013-10-14 11:18:17
date last changed
2013-10-14 11:18:17
@misc{4091623,
  abstract     = {Recent years have seen an explosion in innovative and sustainable mobility service offerings, especially car sharing and bike sharing. The latter contribute to sustainability by reducing individual car ownership, which has negative social, economic and especially environmental consequences. Yet, both industrial and academic discourses point out that no single mobility service is enough to meet the growing challenges presented by complex urban transport problems. Therefore not only new but also combined forms of services should be considered as part of a “full mobility package” in today’s smarter, more sustainable European cities. Although the literature is rich concerning the “what” and “why” of integrated mobility service (IMS) systems, there is much to be desired in terms of the “how”, or the operationalizing and mainstreaming of IMS. European cities are seemingly equipped with all the pieces of the integration puzzle, but fitting them together in a resource efficient, cost-effective and environmentally sound way presents considerable challenges. Furthermore, few examples of IMS product-service systems exist in practice. To fill these research gaps, this exploratory thesis seeks to generate critical knowledge by identifying the major drivers, barriers and enabling factors for the mainstreaming of integrated mobility services into the European market. Three case examples are presented in an attempt to determine best practices, and distinguish key catalysts and obstacles facing the proliferation mobility servicizing in Europe. Product-service system theory is used as an analytical basis from which to understand and map this emerging field and associated frameworks are used to analyze and suggest ways of overcoming barriers facing integration. The study concludes by discussing the future of European integrated mobility services and makes suggestions for further research.},
  author       = {Harper, Nicole},
  issn         = {1401-9191},
  keyword      = {combined mobility,integrated transport,mobility management,sustainable transport,mobility servicizing},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  series       = {IIIEE Master thesis},
  title        = {"If this is the future, where's my mobilitypack? Drivers, barriers and enabling factors for the mainstreaming of integrated mobility services in Europe},
  year         = {2013},
}