Skip to main content

LUP Student Papers

LUND UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES

Radial infall of pebbles and dust pile-up at the ice line in a protoplanetary disk

Jeppsson, Erik LU (2013) In Lund Observatory Examensarbeten ASTK01 20131
Department of Astronomy and Theoretical Physics
Lund Observatory
Abstract
We investigate the radial infall of ice pebbles in a protoplanetary disk, and how these tend to end up in relatively close proximity to eachother, providing a possible spawning ground for planets. These pebbles have dust particles embedded in them, which are released as the pebble crosses the so-called ice- line, where the ice evaporates. This is interesting as the dust will pile up around this ice line and possibly form planets over time. A simple model of the radial infall is set up, using the programming language IDL, and evidence of this dust pile-up at the ice line is shown. We use an ice-line situated at 3 AU, and the Minimum Mass Solar Nebula equations of Hayashi. We find that the test particles do indeed collect inside the radius... (More)
We investigate the radial infall of ice pebbles in a protoplanetary disk, and how these tend to end up in relatively close proximity to eachother, providing a possible spawning ground for planets. These pebbles have dust particles embedded in them, which are released as the pebble crosses the so-called ice- line, where the ice evaporates. This is interesting as the dust will pile up around this ice line and possibly form planets over time. A simple model of the radial infall is set up, using the programming language IDL, and evidence of this dust pile-up at the ice line is shown. We use an ice-line situated at 3 AU, and the Minimum Mass Solar Nebula equations of Hayashi. We find that the test particles do indeed collect inside the radius of 3 AU after an elapsed time of 105 − 106 years. We also find that the streaming instability mechanic is a probable culprit in attaining high particle density. Finally, we correlate the results with the currently known exoplanets, and find that the thus far detected exoplanets seem to exist in close proximity to their respective stars, inside their ice-line radius. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Jeppsson, Erik LU
supervisor
organization
course
ASTK01 20131
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
publication/series
Lund Observatory Examensarbeten
report number
2013-EXA77
language
English
id
4300543
date added to LUP
2014-02-11 10:57:17
date last changed
2014-02-11 10:57:17
@misc{4300543,
  abstract     = {We investigate the radial infall of ice pebbles in a protoplanetary disk, and how these tend to end up in relatively close proximity to eachother, providing a possible spawning ground for planets. These pebbles have dust particles embedded in them, which are released as the pebble crosses the so-called ice- line, where the ice evaporates. This is interesting as the dust will pile up around this ice line and possibly form planets over time. A simple model of the radial infall is set up, using the programming language IDL, and evidence of this dust pile-up at the ice line is shown. We use an ice-line situated at 3 AU, and the Minimum Mass Solar Nebula equations of Hayashi. We find that the test particles do indeed collect inside the radius of 3 AU after an elapsed time of 105 − 106 years. We also find that the streaming instability mechanic is a probable culprit in attaining high particle density. Finally, we correlate the results with the currently known exoplanets, and find that the thus far detected exoplanets seem to exist in close proximity to their respective stars, inside their ice-line radius.},
  author       = {Jeppsson, Erik},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  series       = {Lund Observatory Examensarbeten},
  title        = {Radial infall of pebbles and dust pile-up at the ice line in a protoplanetary disk},
  year         = {2013},
}