Skip to main content

LUP Student Papers

LUND UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES

Inductive energy transfer

Svensson, Alexander (2013) In CODEN:LUTEDX/TEIE EIE920 20131
Industrial Electrical Engineering and Automation
Abstract
With the diminishing reserves of oil and the growing public concern for environmental issues, the end of gasoline powered vehicles is getting closer each year. To prevent this from causing the personal and comfortable way of transportation mankind has gotten used to, to die with them, an alternative without the downsides of the gasoline engine must be developed. The environmentally friendly electric vehicle is such an alternative, but this comes with problems of its own, range and charging time.
A way to solve these problems is to charge the vehicles continuously from the road, which could be done through inductive power transfer. Such systems exist but because of large air gap they are large and impractical on a large scale. By combining... (More)
With the diminishing reserves of oil and the growing public concern for environmental issues, the end of gasoline powered vehicles is getting closer each year. To prevent this from causing the personal and comfortable way of transportation mankind has gotten used to, to die with them, an alternative without the downsides of the gasoline engine must be developed. The environmentally friendly electric vehicle is such an alternative, but this comes with problems of its own, range and charging time.
A way to solve these problems is to charge the vehicles continuously from the road, which could be done through inductive power transfer. Such systems exist but because of large air gap they are large and impractical on a large scale. By combining this with air bearing it could enable the air gap to be greatly reduced, leading to less material and power requirements.
Through simulations and calculations regarding inductive power transfer, a model for transferring the necessary power was designed to show whether air bearing can be used with this technique to decrease the air gap and minimise the material and power needed. The tests show that transferring the required power is feasible even when everything is scaled down as a result of a smaller air gap. From a receiver of roughly 200 mm times 100 mm, 30 kW can be delivered to the car’s engine and battery, and for a lorry six of these receivers provide almost 200 kW.
Although there are still optimisations to be made, the results show that combining inductive power transfer with air bearing could be the solution for making continuous charging from the road possible in the future. With this, electric vehicles could make gasoline obsolete as fuel for personal transportation. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Svensson, Alexander
supervisor
organization
course
EIE920 20131
year
type
H3 - Professional qualifications (4 Years - )
subject
publication/series
CODEN:LUTEDX/TEIE
report number
5310
language
English
id
4537518
date added to LUP
2014-10-16 13:56:34
date last changed
2014-10-16 13:56:34
@misc{4537518,
  abstract     = {With the diminishing reserves of oil and the growing public concern for environmental issues, the end of gasoline powered vehicles is getting closer each year. To prevent this from causing the personal and comfortable way of transportation mankind has gotten used to, to die with them, an alternative without the downsides of the gasoline engine must be developed. The environmentally friendly electric vehicle is such an alternative, but this comes with problems of its own, range and charging time.
A way to solve these problems is to charge the vehicles continuously from the road, which could be done through inductive power transfer. Such systems exist but because of large air gap they are large and impractical on a large scale. By combining this with air bearing it could enable the air gap to be greatly reduced, leading to less material and power requirements.
Through simulations and calculations regarding inductive power transfer, a model for transferring the necessary power was designed to show whether air bearing can be used with this technique to decrease the air gap and minimise the material and power needed. The tests show that transferring the required power is feasible even when everything is scaled down as a result of a smaller air gap. From a receiver of roughly 200 mm times 100 mm, 30 kW can be delivered to the car’s engine and battery, and for a lorry six of these receivers provide almost 200 kW.
Although there are still optimisations to be made, the results show that combining inductive power transfer with air bearing could be the solution for making continuous charging from the road possible in the future. With this, electric vehicles could make gasoline obsolete as fuel for personal transportation.},
  author       = {Svensson, Alexander},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  series       = {CODEN:LUTEDX/TEIE},
  title        = {Inductive energy transfer},
  year         = {2013},
}