Advanced

Jämställd föräldraförsäkring? En rättspolitisk utredning om fördelning av föräldraledigheten ur ett genusperspektiv

Bengtsson, Nina LU (2014) LAGM01 20142
Department of Law
Abstract
Sweden has one of the world's most generous parental insurance. The parental insurance is designed to be gender neutral, but despite this, women take out more than 75 percent of the parental leave. The purpose of this paper is to, from a gender rights scientific perspective, investigate whether an individualised parental leave should be introduced and to conduct a gender-critical legal policy study of law by applying feminist theories on it.

The essay begins with a description of the regulation of parental leave from an historical perspective in Sweden and a description of how the regulation has evolved. When women entered the working market a need for legislation that regulated the situation for women in pregnancy and childbirth arose.... (More)
Sweden has one of the world's most generous parental insurance. The parental insurance is designed to be gender neutral, but despite this, women take out more than 75 percent of the parental leave. The purpose of this paper is to, from a gender rights scientific perspective, investigate whether an individualised parental leave should be introduced and to conduct a gender-critical legal policy study of law by applying feminist theories on it.

The essay begins with a description of the regulation of parental leave from an historical perspective in Sweden and a description of how the regulation has evolved. When women entered the working market a need for legislation that regulated the situation for women in pregnancy and childbirth arose. In 1962 a maternity insurance that gave all women compensation for lost income was introduced. As women increasingly entered the working market and a thought of equality began to permeate society a discussion on a reformed legislation arose. In 1974 the maternity insurance was converted into a parental insurance, which in return led to both women and men being able to partake. In 1974, only 0.5 percent of all parental leave days were paid out to men, which further demonstrates that the distribution between the parents was warped. In 1995, Sweden introduced 30 days of compensation that was reserved for each individual parent and these particular days were called paternity month. The number of fathers who took out days increased, but the number of utilised days per father fell. Seven years later an additional paternity month was introduced, which resulted in fathers' increasing their amount of parental days.

Equality regarding parental leave has been improving, yet the problem persists. In 2013, males accounted for 24.8 percent of the parental leave, whilst women accounted for 75.2 percent. If taking in to consideration that only the days that fathers are on parental leave during the first two years are studied, the picture is different, since the fathers then accounts for 9 percent the first year and 17 percent the second year. Approximately 25 percent of all fathers do not charge a single day with parental leave during the child’s first two years. Parents are entitled to half of the parental leave days each, but a parent can transfer all their days, except for 60, to the other parent. Despite the opportunities for parents to share the parental leave equally, the sharing is not equal.

What are the pros and cons with an individualised parental leave? An argument not to revise the law is the individual's freedom to make its own decisions. However, there are critics who argue that these types of decision are taken on the basis of ingrained gender roles. Several theorists argue that gender is a social construct and that genetics thus cannot explain women and men's different qualities. By considering this approach it indicates that an individualised parental leave is desirable.

Legislation is considered to have a normative effect, but there is a dis-agreement about the extent to which it is possible to use the law to change people's values, beliefs and behaviors.

Another argument that is usually presented when individualised parental benefits are discussed is pointing towards the family economy would worsen if more men would use the parental insurance. However, studies have shown that it is the families who would make a financial loss if the father stayed at home that has actually used this opportunity, while those family’s that would not significantly be affected chose not to share the parental leave. There are studies that show that there are positive effects for men if they increase their use of parental leave. There are employers who believe that fathers' parental leave increases the father’s social competence. There is a distinct connection between fathers’ involvement and children’s development, but if the mother is at home together with the father, his role does not become as significant.

More than a third of Sweden's population lives in a family constellation that is not a nuclear family. There is a risk that the individualisation of parental insurance would not fit in these types of family constellations.

Reforms for equality have in the past proven to be effective for women's emancipation. The transition from joint taxation to individual taxation made it worth it for women to work. An individualised parental insurance would result in women getting a better position on the working market, because the statistical discrimination against women would decrease and it would also lead to women's pensions and wages would increase and they could also work full-time to a greater extent.

After weighing pros and counterarguments with an individualised parental against each other, it is clear that it is not obvious that a solution like that is the best option. It is important to take into consideration what people think when introducing radical legislative changes, to make the law effective and legitimate. The question is whether it is possible to assume that people think rationally, or if people's habitual thought patterns based on normative beliefs stand in the way of a revised legislation.

The essay’s last question asks what impact the current arrangements regarding parental leave has for the gender equality. In order to strengthen the position of women as a part of the workforce a system that allows more consistent use of parental days than today is required, and to achieve this goal, we need a revised legislation. One possible solution is an individualisation of parental insurance. Another solution is a three-part insurance. One problem with such division may be that it is not adapted for other types of family constellations than the classic nuclear family. Another option is to increase the number of reserved months. There are no arguments good enough not to speed this process up. The gender-neutral legislation does not reflect on the actual division of parental leave and the legislature must use their power to further develop the legislation. An individualised parental insurance, or the introduction of more reserved months, is going to be beneficial for both men and women. (Less)
Abstract (Swedish)
Sverige har en av världens mest generösa föräldraförsäkringar. Föräldraförsäkringen är könsneutralt utformad, men trots detta tar kvinnor ut drygt 75 procent av föräldraledigheten. Syftet med denna uppsats är att, ur ett genusrättsvetenskapligt perspektiv, utreda om en individualiserad föräldraförsäkring borde införas och att genomföra en genuskritisk rättspolitisk studie av rätten genom att applicera feministiska teorier på den.

Uppsatsen tar avstamp i hur regleringen av föräldraledighet historiskt har sett ut i Sverige och hur lagstiftningen har utvecklats. När kvinnor började förvärvsarbeta uppstod ett behov av lagstiftning som reglerade kvinnors situation vid graviditet och barnafödelse. År 1962 infördes en moderskapsförsäkring som... (More)
Sverige har en av världens mest generösa föräldraförsäkringar. Föräldraförsäkringen är könsneutralt utformad, men trots detta tar kvinnor ut drygt 75 procent av föräldraledigheten. Syftet med denna uppsats är att, ur ett genusrättsvetenskapligt perspektiv, utreda om en individualiserad föräldraförsäkring borde införas och att genomföra en genuskritisk rättspolitisk studie av rätten genom att applicera feministiska teorier på den.

Uppsatsen tar avstamp i hur regleringen av föräldraledighet historiskt har sett ut i Sverige och hur lagstiftningen har utvecklats. När kvinnor började förvärvsarbeta uppstod ett behov av lagstiftning som reglerade kvinnors situation vid graviditet och barnafödelse. År 1962 infördes en moderskapsförsäkring som gav alla kvinnor ersättning för förlorad arbetsinkomst. När kvinnor i allt större utsträckning började förvärvsarbeta och en jämställdhetstanke började genomsyra samhället uppstod en diskussion om en reformerad lagstiftning. År 1974 gjordes moderskapsförsäkringen om till en föräldraförsäkring, vilket innebar att både kvinnor och män fick ta del av den. År 1974 betalades endast 0,5 procent av alla föräldrapenningdagar ut till män, vilket visar att fördelningen mellan föräldrarna var skev. År 1995 införde Sverige 30 ersättningsdagar som var reserverade för vardera föräldern och som kallades för pappamånaden. Antalet pappor som tog ut dagar ökade, men antalet utnyttjade dagar per pappa sjönk. Sju år senare infördes den andra pappamånaden, vilket resulterade i att pappors uttag ökade ytterligare.

Jämställdheten i föräldraledighetsuttaget har förbättrats, men problematiken kvarstår. År 2013 stod män för 24,8 procent av uttaget av föräldrapenning, medan kvinnorna stod för 75,2 procent. Om enbart pappors uttag under de två första åren studeras ser bilden annorlunda ut, eftersom papporna då tar ut 9 respektive 17 procent. Ungefär 25 procent av papporna tar inte ut någon föräldrapenningdag under barnets första två levnadsår. Föräldrarna är berättigade hälften av föräldrapenningdagarna vardera, men en förälder har möjlighet att överföra alla sina dagar, förutom 60 dagar, till den andra föräldern. Trots att det därmed finns förutsättningar för föräldrar att dela lika på föräldraledigheten är uttaget inte jämställt.

Vilka för- och motargument finns med en individualiserad föräldraförsäkring? Ett argument för att inte revidera lagstiftningen är individens frihet att fatta egna beslut. Det finns dock kritiker som menar att denna typ av beslut fattas på grundval av invanda könsroller. Flera teoretiker menar att kön är en social konstruktion och att genetik därmed inte kan förklara kvinnors och mäns olika egenskaper. Detta synsätt talar därmed för införandet av en individualiserad föräldraförsäkring.

Lagstiftning anses ha en normbildande effekt, men det råder delade meningar om i vilken utsträckning det går att använda lagstiftning för att ändra på människors värderingar, åsikter och beteenden.

Ett annat argument som ofta framförs när individualiserad föräldraförsäkring diskuteras är att familjeekonomin skulle försämras om män i större utsträckning skulle utnyttja föräldraförsäkringen. Studier har dock visat att det är de familjer som skulle göra en ekonomisk förlust genom att pappan stannade hemma som faktiskt utnyttjade denna möjlighet, medan de par som inte skulle påverkas nämnvärt valde att inte dela på föräldraledigheten. Det finns studier som visar att det finns positiva effekter för män om de ökar sitt uttag av föräldraledigheten. Det finns arbetsgivare som anser att pappors föräldraledighet leder till ökad social kompetens för papporna. Det finns ett tydligt samband mellan pappans engagemang och barnets utveckling, men om mamman är hemma tillsammans med pappan, blir inte hans roll lika stor.

Mer än en tredjedel av Sveriges befolkning lever idag i en annan familjekonstellation än i en typisk kärnfamilj. Det finns en risk för att en individualisering av föräldraförsäkringen inte skulle passa i dessa typer av familjekonstellationer.

Jämställdhetsreformer har tidigare i historien visat sig vara effektiva för kvinnors emancipation. Övergången från sambeskattning till särbeskattning medförde att det lönade sig för kvinnor att gå ut i arbetslivet. En individualiserad föräldraförsäkring skulle leda till att kvinnor får ett bättre utgångsläge på arbetsmarknaden genom att den statistiska diskrimineringen av kvinnor skulle minska och kvinnors pensioner och löner höjs och de skulle kunna arbeta heltid i större utsträckning.

Efter att ha vägt för- och motargument med en individualiserad föräldraförsäkring mot varandra går det att konstatera att det inte är självklart att en sådan lösning är det bästa alternativet. Det är viktigt att ta hänsyn till vad befolkningen tycker vid införandet av radikala lagförändringar för att lagen ska kunna bli effektiv och legitim. Frågan är om det går att utgå ifrån att människor tänker rationellt, eller om människors invanda tankemönster baserade på normativa föreställningar står i vägen för en reviderad lagstiftning.

Uppsatsens sista frågeställning gäller vilka konsekvenser den nuvarande ordningen gällande föräldraledighet har för jämställdheten. För att stärka kvinnors ställning på arbetsmarknaden krävs ett jämnare uttag av föräldradagar än vad som är fallet idag och för att nå detta mål behövs en reviderad lagstiftning. En möjlig lösning är en individualisering av föräldraförsäkringen. En annan lösning är en tredelad försäkring. Ett problem med en sådan uppdelning kan vara att den inte är anpassad efter andra typer av familjekonstellationer än den klassiska kärnfamiljen. Ett annat alternativ är att utöka antalet reserverade månader. Det finns inga tillräckligt bra argument för att inte påskynda denna process. Den könsneutrala lagstiftningen avspeglar sig inte på det faktiska uttaget och därför måste lagstiftaren använda sin makt till att ytterligare utveckla regleringen. En individualiserad föräldraförsäkring, eller ett införande av fler reserverade månader, hade gynnat både män och kvinnor. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Bengtsson, Nina LU
supervisor
organization
alternative title
Equal parental insurance? A legal policy study on the distribution of parental leave from a gender perspective
course
LAGM01 20142
year
type
H3 - Professional qualifications (4 Years - )
subject
keywords
familjerätt, socialrätt, arbetsrätt, individualiserad föräldraförsäkring, jämställdhet, genusrättsvetenskap, genus, pappamånad
language
Swedish
id
4917987
date added to LUP
2015-04-01 10:36:29
date last changed
2015-04-01 10:36:29
@misc{4917987,
  abstract     = {Sweden has one of the world's most generous parental insurance. The parental insurance is designed to be gender neutral, but despite this, women take out more than 75 percent of the parental leave. The purpose of this paper is to, from a gender rights scientific perspective, investigate whether an individualised parental leave should be introduced and to conduct a gender-critical legal policy study of law by applying feminist theories on it.

The essay begins with a description of the regulation of parental leave from an historical perspective in Sweden and a description of how the regulation has evolved. When women entered the working market a need for legislation that regulated the situation for women in pregnancy and childbirth arose. In 1962 a maternity insurance that gave all women compensation for lost income was introduced. As women increasingly entered the working market and a thought of equality began to permeate society a discussion on a reformed legislation arose. In 1974 the maternity insurance was converted into a parental insurance, which in return led to both women and men being able to partake. In 1974, only 0.5 percent of all parental leave days were paid out to men, which further demonstrates that the distribution between the parents was warped. In 1995, Sweden introduced 30 days of compensation that was reserved for each individual parent and these particular days were called paternity month. The number of fathers who took out days increased, but the number of utilised days per father fell. Seven years later an additional paternity month was introduced, which resulted in fathers' increasing their amount of parental days. 

Equality regarding parental leave has been improving, yet the problem persists. In 2013, males accounted for 24.8 percent of the parental leave, whilst women accounted for 75.2 percent. If taking in to consideration that only the days that fathers are on parental leave during the first two years are studied, the picture is different, since the fathers then accounts for 9 percent the first year and 17 percent the second year. Approximately 25 percent of all fathers do not charge a single day with parental leave during the child’s first two years. Parents are entitled to half of the parental leave days each, but a parent can transfer all their days, except for 60, to the other parent. Despite the opportunities for parents to share the parental leave equally, the sharing is not equal.

What are the pros and cons with an individualised parental leave? An argument not to revise the law is the individual's freedom to make its own decisions. However, there are critics who argue that these types of decision are taken on the basis of ingrained gender roles. Several theorists argue that gender is a social construct and that genetics thus cannot explain women and men's different qualities. By considering this approach it indicates that an individualised parental leave is desirable.

Legislation is considered to have a normative effect, but there is a dis-agreement about the extent to which it is possible to use the law to change people's values, beliefs and behaviors.

Another argument that is usually presented when individualised parental benefits are discussed is pointing towards the family economy would worsen if more men would use the parental insurance. However, studies have shown that it is the families who would make a financial loss if the father stayed at home that has actually used this opportunity, while those family’s that would not significantly be affected chose not to share the parental leave. There are studies that show that there are positive effects for men if they increase their use of parental leave. There are employers who believe that fathers' parental leave increases the father’s social competence. There is a distinct connection between fathers’ involvement and children’s development, but if the mother is at home together with the father, his role does not become as significant.

More than a third of Sweden's population lives in a family constellation that is not a nuclear family. There is a risk that the individualisation of parental insurance would not fit in these types of family constellations.

Reforms for equality have in the past proven to be effective for women's emancipation. The transition from joint taxation to individual taxation made it worth it for women to work. An individualised parental insurance would result in women getting a better position on the working market, because the statistical discrimination against women would decrease and it would also lead to women's pensions and wages would increase and they could also work full-time to a greater extent.

After weighing pros and counterarguments with an individualised parental against each other, it is clear that it is not obvious that a solution like that is the best option. It is important to take into consideration what people think when introducing radical legislative changes, to make the law effective and legitimate. The question is whether it is possible to assume that people think rationally, or if people's habitual thought patterns based on normative beliefs stand in the way of a revised legislation.

The essay’s last question asks what impact the current arrangements regarding parental leave has for the gender equality. In order to strengthen the position of women as a part of the workforce a system that allows more consistent use of parental days than today is required, and to achieve this goal, we need a revised legislation. One possible solution is an individualisation of parental insurance. Another solution is a three-part insurance. One problem with such division may be that it is not adapted for other types of family constellations than the classic nuclear family. Another option is to increase the number of reserved months. There are no arguments good enough not to speed this process up. The gender-neutral legislation does not reflect on the actual division of parental leave and the legislature must use their power to further develop the legislation. An individualised parental insurance, or the introduction of more reserved months, is going to be beneficial for both men and women.},
  author       = {Bengtsson, Nina},
  keyword      = {familjerätt,socialrätt,arbetsrätt,individualiserad föräldraförsäkring,jämställdhet,genusrättsvetenskap,genus,pappamånad},
  language     = {swe},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Jämställd föräldraförsäkring? En rättspolitisk utredning om fördelning av föräldraledigheten ur ett genusperspektiv},
  year         = {2014},
}